Home / People  / Advocates  / ‘Ugly’ Produce: A Tasty Food Fad Everyone Can Savor

‘Ugly’ Produce: A Tasty Food Fad Everyone Can Savor

Roopam Lunia, director of marketing at the company in Imperfect Produce in San Francisco’s East Bay, shows off an eggplant culled in the packing sheds. Promoters have struggled with descriptors such as “ugly,” “misshapen” or “funny-looking” -- but how about “practically perfect”? Credit: Copyright 2015 Seth Joel

Roopam Lunia, director of marketing at the company in Imperfect Produce in San Francisco’s East Bay, shows off an eggplant culled in the packing sheds. Promoters have struggled with descriptors such as “ugly,” “misshapen” or “funny-looking” -- but how about “practically perfect”? Credit: Copyright 2015 Seth Joel

Would you like to reduce agricultural waste, save water, support innovation, lower your grocery bill and eat farm-fresh produce all at the same time? Imperfect Produce in San Francisco’s East Bay has you covered.

In “Wasted,” a report for the Natural Resources Defense Council, scientist Dana Gunder estimated that 40% of all the food produced in the United States is lost due to inefficiencies in the supply chain. Her analysis showed that, in the case of fresh produce, these losses occur before it even hits retail stores, the greatest percentage happening in the field and post-harvest in the packing sheds — primarily as a means of meeting customers’ “expectation of cosmetic perfection.”

Three committed food-waste experts — Ben Chesler, Ben Simon and Ron Clark — founded Imperfect Produce to reduce this waste by developing a supply and distribution network that brings physically “flawed” yet edible, in-season fruits and vegetables culled from packing plants directly to customers’ homes via a weekly delivery service. As the slideshow explains, it’s a perfect solution.

More from Zester Daily:
» Dumpster dining and roadkill gourmet
» Stop throwing away the best part of spinach
» When lettuce bolts, you can still capture its flavor
» Don’t toss lobster shells

Main photo: Roopam Lunia, director of marketing at the company Imperfect Produce in San Francisco‘s East Bay, shows off an eggplant culled in the packing sheds. Promoters have struggled with descriptors such as “ugly,”misshapen” or “funny-looking” — but how about “practically perfect”Credit: Copyright 2015 Seth Joel



Zester Daily contributor Seth Joel has been a professional photographer since he was 21. Seth’s first major project was to set up a studio in the Forbidden City in Beijing and photograph the famous Terracotta Army for the Metropolitan Museum of Art. He went on to shoot and publish books for Time Inc., Harry N. Abrams, Alfred Knopf, Amphoto and Smithsonian. You can see more of his work on his website.

NO COMMENTS

POST A COMMENT