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Brassica rapa at the Palo del Colle market in Puglia, Italy. Credit: Copyright 2014 Nathan Hoyt/Forktales

Summer has yet to deliver its full range of vegetables, but one stalwart crop that keeps on giving is Brassica rapa (from rapum, Latin for "turnip"). Brimming with flavor, this vegetable is known variously in its native Italy as cime di rapa ("turnip tops"), broccoletti di rape or just rape

A smattering of food on a summer picnic.

You're standing on a rooftop in Portland, Ore., Aperol spritz in hand. The bubbly orange cocktail matches the summer sky at sunset. Prosciutto-wrapped grissini -- long, crispy breadsticks enveloped in buttery ham -- appear as if by magic for snacking. City lights sparkle below and bridges reach across the Willamette

Yotam Ottolenghi's yogurt-drizzled butternut squash. Credit: Reprinted with permission from NOPI: The Cookbook by Yotam Ottolenghi and Ramael Scully, copyright 2015. Published by Ten Speed Press, an imprint of Penguin Random House LLC. Food photography: Copyright 2015 Jonathan Lovekin Location photography: Copyright 2015 Adam Hinton

Yogurt is not for just breakfast or smoothies anymore. While the dairy cases in supermarkets across the nation populate with more brands, tubs and tubes of yogurt -- including novel flavors like sriricha-mango and carrot -- a parallel trend is making it a star ingredient in cooking. Beyond its compatibility

Viola Buitoni's Sauteed Broccoli Rapini with Potatoes. Credit: Hirsheimer & Hamilton, from "Italian Home Cooking: 125 Recipes to Comfort Your Soul"

Cime di rapa (turnip tops), broccoli di rapa, broccoletti di rapa, and rape (räp' - eh), are Italian names for what Americans dub broccoli rabe, or raab. Because the cruciferous vegetable (Brassica rapa ruvo) descends from the wild mustard plants that have carpeted the heel of Italy's boot since ancient times,

Harvesting the ancient tomatoes of Naples, San Marzano, Campania. Credit: Paolo Ruggiero, DaniCoop

A question I'm often asked is how to make the best so-called "marinara." It's one that vexes me as much as the perennial hunt for the best pizza that makes good headlines. How could only one out of countless others be "best"? To begin with,"marinara" is a misnomer. While in

Brownies and cookies made with olive oil. Credit: Nancy Harmon Jenkins

Making a healthy start this spring, I went into the kitchen to cook with olive oil. Now I know there are all sorts of people, chefs among them, who will claim "you can't cook with extra virgin olive oil." Where they get this from is a mystery, but it's a myth

Fresh-squeezed lemonade at The Desert Bar in Parker, Arizona. Credit: Copyright Seth Joel 2015

There may be no better example of a destination watering hole than the one on the site of the abandoned Nellie E Mine outside Parker, Arizona. Ken Wardlow's Desert Bar is in such a remote location in the Buckskin Mountains that just getting there is an adventure. But it's no secret to

A salad of wild greens, drizzled with plenty of olive oil, contains more nutrients than commercially grown greens. Credit: Copyright Rosemary Barron

The diet world is a very crowded place, and advice is constantly changing. But, very slowly, we're coming to realize what the physicians of Greek antiquity well understood -- that "food" is far more than something we put in our mouths and swallow. In fact, the ancient diet of the