Carole Murko's Image

Carole Murko

From:

Stockbridge, Mass.

Author's website
Author's twitter
Author's facebook

Carole Murko is the creator, host and executive producer of the weekly radio program "Heirloom Meals," a storytelling show she created to share treasured family recipes, stories and tips … "savoring yesterday's traditions today," on NPR affiliate Robinhood Radio, WHDD, 91.5 FM in Sharon, Conn. A culinary artist who learned how to cook by observing her mother and grandmother, Carole captures their passion for cooking, entertaining, and feeding friends and family, and translates it into her own special way of honoring the traditions she loved as a child. She regularly appears as a food expert and demo chef on Newschannel 13, the NBC affiliate in Albany, New York. Carole developed and was host of a 16-video series featuring diabetes-friendly heirloom recipes for Liberty Medical that launched on its website in November 2011. She executive-produced and was host of Heirloom Meals’ "Thanksgiving and Heirloom Meals' Christmas," scheduled to air on 90% of the public televisions stations across the nation in November and December of 2012. She writes for Edible Berkshires and blogs most days. Carole holds a bachelor's degree in economics and a minor in art history from Smith College, a master's degree in International Economics from New York University and the Chartered Financial Analyst (CFA) designation. Before founding "Heirloom Meals," Carole had successful careers on Wall Street and in interior design and decoration.

Articles by Author

Pecking Order: 5 Best Backyard Chicken Breeds Image

Chickens came into my life in an unexpected way. I am a city girl. I was raised in the suburbs of New York City and later lived in the city and in Boston. I neither thought of nor envisioned raising backyard chickens. But my move to the Berkshires of western Massachusetts — Stockbridge, to be exact — and the little boy, Matthew, who would become my stepson, changed all that.

On a trip to Bozeman, Montana, we took a day off from skiing at Big Sky Resort. We thought a trip to a giant farm store would be entertaining as well as educational. When we arrived, Matthew leaped out of the car. As we neared the store, he proclaimed, “I hear them! I hear them!” In a flash, Matthew was cuddling a fluff ball of a baby chick. I could tell he was in love as he lifted it to his face to feel its soft down. You can imagine our surprise when Matthew belted out, “Dad, give me my $3. I’m buying these chicks!”

We didn’t buy those chicks that day, but I did promise that we’d get some when we returned home. Being a new stepmom, I had no idea — let me say that again, no idea — my seemingly clever solution to not buying the chicks in Montana, an intended false promise that I was sure Matthew would soon forget, would result in my love affair with chickens and an amazing bond with my stepson.

Raising backyard chickens has increased in popularity in recent years. An online survey of backyard chicken owners, by the Poultry Science Association in 2014, found that nearly three-quarters of the nearly 1,500 respondents owned fewer than 10 chickens. And the major reasons for raising backyard chickens were as food for home use (95%), gardening partners (63%), pets (57%) or a combination of all three.

Here are my “top fives” — breeds to own and reasons to raise backyard chickens.

Top breeds to own

I have bought my chickens from a variety of sources, from the local Agway or Tractor Supply to mail-ordering them from Murray McMurray’s. Storey Publishing has a great book about breeds and raising chickens. Here are my favorite five:

Easy to care for

Free-range chickens feed inside a protective fence. Credit: Copyright Thinkstock/ands456

Free-range chickens feed inside a protective fence. Credit: Copyright Thinkstock/ands456

Chickens need a safe roosting spot at night to protect them from land and air predators such as coyote or owls. They need an area to peck around outside. Our chickens are free to roam, but you can build a caged area or get movable solar-electric fencing. The chickens need fresh water and chicken food. Local nursery or tractor supply stores carry chicken feed.

Entertaining antics

Our chickens enjoying a drink from our backyard spring. Credit: Copyright Carole Murko

Our chickens enjoying a drink from our backyard spring. Credit: Copyright Carole Murko

Our backyard chickens’ antics immediately melt away any negative feelings or issues I might be carrying from my daily activities. With a side-eye glance, the chickens quickly communicate to me how they love seeing the hand that feeds them. And, of course, what do I do? I feed them. I would be an excellent Pavlovian subject. Chickens have great personalities. They are playful and social. Last summer, one of our chickens, Honey Bunny, was in love with my husband. He was working on the barn and would hear rustling and out would pop Honey Bunny. She was so present during the project that she even managed to imprint her feet in the concrete footing. If that doesn’t provide a good giggle, I don’t know what will.

They become family pets

Matthew and one of his girls. Credit: Copyright Carole Murko

Matthew and one of his girls. Credit: Copyright Carole Murko

Many days when I arrive home, I am greeted by the joyful explosion of rapid wing-fluttering, running chickens. Who knew they could bond so strongly with human caretakers and be so excited to see us? The bonding happens at the human level as well. For me, chickens, like most pets, become family members. Adults and kids alike fall in love with the spirited personalities, joyful antics and the wonderful communicative noises of the chickens. While we all recognize the cock-a-doodle-doo of a rooster, the hens trill, purr and cluck — each in her own voice. I have learned to discern sounds of contentedness versus fear.

Builds community

The best part of raising backyard chickens: eggs. Credit: Copyright Thinkstock/Stigar

The best part of raising backyard chickens: eggs. Credit: Copyright Thinkstock/Stigar

When you’ve got chickens, you’ve got eggs. And that means your neighbors quickly become your friends as there is nothing better than fresh eggs! The eggs also make great hostess gifts. My stepson had a great egg business for a while — he sold eggs to many neighbors and friends who both loved seeing this proud little boy but also enjoyed the rich eggs.

Who doesn’t love fresh eggs?

Poached eggs on toast. Credit: Copyright Thinkstock/Joe Gough

Poached eggs on toast. Credit: Copyright Thinkstock/Joe Gough

This may be the most obvious of all … but the eggs are perfection. Once you have had an egg from pasture-raised chickens that eat bugs, grass and the like, you will find store-bought eggs tasteless and anemic.

Their yolks are the color of the setting sun, their texture and fresh extraordinary taste are unparalleled. Poached eggs on toast are perhaps the best way to relish the perfection of the egg and its taste, while a frittata, in any flavor, offers a perfect simple lunch or dinner entrée.

Perfect Poached Eggs

Prep time: 1 to 2 minute

Cook time: 3 to 8 minutes

Total time: 4 to 10 minutes

Yield: 1 serving

Ingredients

1 tablespoon white wine vinegar

2 eggs

Toast of your choice

Butter

Salt and pepper

Directions

1. Boil water in a sauté pan with white wine vinegar.

2. Crack egg and boil until preferred doneness.

3. Placed on buttered toast.

4. Add salt and pepper, and savor each bite.

Potato frittata. Credit: Copyright iStock/Olha_Afanasieva

Potato frittata. Credit: Copyright iStock/Olha_Afanasieva

Potato Frittata

Prep time: 10 to 15

Cook time: 35 to 40

Total time: 45 to 55 minutes

Yield: 4 servings

Ingredients

2 tablespoons olive oil

3 potatoes, boiled and sliced

1 onion, chopped

Salt and pepper

6 eggs, well-beaten

1/2 cup cheddar

Chives, chopped for garnish

Directions

1. Preheat oven to 400 F.

2. Heat the olive oil in a medium frying pan, making sure the sides are well coated.

3. Add the potatoes and onion and sauté until nicely browned. Sprinkle with salt and pepper to taste. Add the eggs and sauté over medium heat for a minute or two until the eggs set up, remove from heat.

4. Sprinkle cheddar on top and place in oven for 10 to 15 minutes or until golden. Remove from oven. Take a spatula around the edges and slide frittata onto a plate.

5. Slice and garnish with chopped chives.

Main photo: Teenage chickens rule the roost. Credit: Copyright Carole Murko

Read More
Finding Joy In A Gluten-Free Valentine’s Day Dinner Image

Nine years ago my husband was diagnosed with celiac disease. The diagnosis was a godsend as his symptoms displayed evidence of something much worse. When the test results were in, we celebrated. We were also quite giddy that he would become well again with the elimination of gluten. What a fabulous prognosis — no drugs, just elimination.

In an interesting twist of fate, our Icelandic mare, Valkyrie, had birthed a foal on the same day as Jim’s diagnosis. We named her Gaefa, which means good luck and good fortune, both of which we felt were in ample supply.

Nine years ago gluten intolerance and celiac disease were not yet mainstream. As you might imagine, stripping my pantry of wheat was both a joyous and sad day for me. Afterall, my one-half Italian being craved homemade pasta, breads and treats. But my sweetheart’s disease was not a death sentence. It was a mere inconvenience. And, I, by golly, would master gluten-free cooking. And I have.

Myriad gluten-free foods

There are myriad foods that are naturally gluten free. Take risotto for one. Steak for another. Greens. Fruits. Chocolate. The list goes on and on.

Here is a perfect gluten-free Valentine’s Day Dinner. My sweetie is happy, and so am I!

Lobster Risotto

Filet Mignon

Arugula Salad With Balsamic Vinaigrette

Flourless Chocolate Cake

I like to create menus that reflect both my culinary acumen, and the love I have for the recipients. There truly is nothing, and I mean nothing, better than watching someone relish what you have cooked for them. This menu is tailored to Jim. He loves risotto, he loves lobster and he loves steak. These recipes provide a great twist on surf and turf as the lobster risotto makes a lovely side to the filet mignon. The arugula salad complements the meal by adding a peppery green, dressed with a sweetish balsamic vinaigrette.

Make sure you leave room, because this flourless chocolate cake will knock your socks off. Happy Valentine’s Day! With love, Carole

Lobster Risotto

Risotto is one of the simplest and most versatile of dishes. And while I provide this recipe as a guide, keep in mind you can make risotto without the white wine, with onions if you don’t have shallots, or with just butter, just olive oil and with many different “add-ins.” To celebrate Valentine’s, however, nothing beats lobster.

Prep time: 20 minutes

Cook time: 20 to 30 minutes

Total time: 40 to 50 minutes

Yield: 3 to 4 servings

Ingredients

1 (1 1/2-pound) lobster (have it steamed at the fish counter to save you a step)

1/2 stick butter

1/2 cup of shallots or onions

1 cup Arborio rice

1/2 cup white wine

4 cups chicken broth, heated

1/2 cup Parmesan cheese, grated

1 to 2 tablespoons fresh lemon juice

1/8 teaspoon fresh pepper

2 teaspoons freshly chopped thyme

Directions

1. Remove meat from lobster, cut into bite-size pieces.

2. Heat butter in a large saucepan over medium heat, add shallots and cook until tender.

3. Stir in rice and stir until coated with oil about 2 minutes.

4. Add the wine and stir until the wine is cooked off and absorbed.

5. Add the broth one ladle at time, stirring constantly until the broth is absorbed. Continue adding broth until rice is fluffy, tender and creamy.

6. Add the Parmesan, lemon juice, pepper and thyme.

7. Fold in the lobster, serve when lobster is warm.

Lobster and filet mignon are the beginnings of a delicious Valentine's Day dinner. Credit: Carole Murko

Lobster and filet mignon are the beginnings of a delicious Valentine’s Day dinner. Credit: Carole Murko

Stove Top Filet Mignon

Prep time: 2 to 3 minutes

Cook time: 8 to 10 minutes

Total time: 10 to 13 minutes

Yield: 4 servings

Ingredients

Four 1/2-pound filets

Salt and pepper

2 tablespoons olive oil

2 tablespoons butter

Cast iron pan

Directions

1. Bring meat to room temperature.

2. Season with salt and pepper.

3. Heat olive oil and butter on high in cast iron pan.

4. Add filets.

5. Cook 4 to 5 minutes per side for medium-rare filets.

In keeping with all the buzz about the aphrodisiac effect of chocolate, a flourless (hence, no gluten) chocolate cake is the perfect ending to a Valentine's Day dinner. Credit: Carole Murko

In keeping with all the buzz about the aphrodisiac effect of chocolate, a flourless (hence, no gluten) chocolate cake is the perfect ending to a Valentine’s Day dinner. Credit: Carole Murko

Heirloom Flourless Chocolate Cake

I love homemade gifts from the heart. My sweetheart, Jim, has celiac disease, which is an autoimmune disease triggered by eating wheat or foods with gluten. So in keeping with all the buzz about the aphrodisiac effect of chocolate, I decided a flourless (hence, no gluten) chocolate cake would be my gift.

This recipe is from the family archives of my amazing friend Deb Mackey, with her note: “Here’s an absolutely FAB recipe for a flourless chocolate cake that is to die for, and can be très elegant, depending on how you gussy it up. I frequently plate it on a swirl of raspberry coulis for especially discerning friends. Everyone I’ve ever made it for has raved, and it became the birthday cake of choice for every man in my life. And for some of their subsequent wives, too, I might add.”

Prep time: 30 to 45 minutes

Cook time: 1 1/2 hours

Total time: 2 to 2 1/4 hours

Yield: 8 to 10 servings

Ingredients

For cake:

12 ounces semisweet chocolate chips

1/2 cup unsalted butter

6 eggs, separated, at room temperature

1 cup sugar

1/2 cup chopped pecans

1/2 teaspoon vanilla

1 tablespoon Bailey’s Irish Cream

1 pinch cream of tartar

For topping:

2 cups whipping cream

1/4 cup powdered sugar

2 tablespoons Bailey’s Irish Cream

2 ounces chocolate curls

10-inch springform pan, greased (or wax/parchment paper will do)

Directions

For cake:

1. Preheat oven to 350 F.

2. Melt chips and butter in a bowl over hot water.

3. Beat egg yolks in large bowl (5 minutes, or until thick).

4. Beat in 1/2 cup sugar, 1 tablespoon at a time.

5. To the melted chocolate, stir in pecans, vanilla and 1 tablespoon of Bailey’s

6. Beat egg whites with cream of tartar, to soft peak

7. Gradually add remaining 1/2 cup sugar. Beat stiff, but not dry.

8. Fold 1/4 of whites mixture into the chocolate cake mix.

9. Fold the chocolate mix into the remaining whites mixture.

10. Pour into lined pan and bake 30 minutes at 350 F.

11. Reduce oven to 275 F. Bake another 30 minutes.

12. Turn off oven. Let cake stand in oven with door slightly ajar for about 30 minutes.

13. Remove from oven. Dampen towel and place on top of cake for 5 minutes. Remove the towel.

14. Top of cake will crack and fall. Cool cake in pan.

15. Remove springform when cool. Transfer cake to platter.

For topping:

Whip cream to soft peak. Beat in powdered sugar and 2 tablespoons of Bailey’s.

Finish cake:

1. Spoon whipped cream mixture over top of cake and smooth. Sprinkle with chocolate curls.

2. Refrigerate 6 hours. Let stand at room temperature for 30 minutes before serving.

Main photo: When your husband loves risotto, lobster and steak, Lobster Risotto and filet mignon offer a great twist on surf and turf. Credit: Carole Murko

Read More
4 Winter Remedies Hidden In Your Kitchen Pantry Image

Wash you hands. Cover your mouth when you cough. Don’t share a glass. Eat your vegetables. Get plenty of rest. Drink lots of liquids. Take your vitamins. Get some fresh air. Keep your hands away from your face.

The list goes on and on. These were the entreaties of my mom and Nana growing up. We would roll our eyes. Their wisdom is now bantered about with abandon by television newscasters, near and far. As if these were earth-shattering discoveries on how to avoid getting a cold or the flu.

The words came along with a long list of home remedies. Did you ever have a bathroom sink filled with hot, steaming water, to be told to hang your head over it? Once you were in position, a towel was tented over your head so you could breathe in all the steam to break up your congestion. What about that Vicks? My mom would take a finger full, put it in a tissue, fold up the tissue, and stick it under my pajama top.

Home remedies

Or, if while having a bout of the croup, you sat on the edge of the tub while steaming hot water poured out of the shower head to help open your airways. When I suffered from the croup, I was given a “cocktail,” most nights before bed. It was either a teaspoon of rye, 1 teaspoon of sugar and some water, or a 7 and 7, in child proportions, of course. Who knew that that nightly “cocktail” would prevent bouts of the croup? I think the “cocktails” relaxed me enough to sleep through the night. To this day, when I smell rye or whiskey, I think of that nightly cocktail.

Mom knows best. Through the ages, our ancestors understood how to avoid ailments or cure them with homemade concoctions. Many are similar across cultures, but I have learned there are some very interesting cures for what ails you.

Gogol-Mogol is an eastern European cure for a sore throat and laryngitis that uses egg yolks, milk and honey. Credit: Carole Murko

Gogol-Mogol is an eastern European cure for a sore throat and laryngitis that uses egg yolks, milk and honey. Credit: Carole Murko

Gogol-Mogol

Take Gogol-Mogol. It is an eastern European cure for a sore throat and laryngitis. There are many “stories” as to where the catchy name derived. I was told the name may have become popular from a famous Soviet children’s book written in the 1960s, Dr. Aybolit, which means Dr. Oh Hurts! I have also read that there was once a Russian singer named Gogol who lost his voice and the remedy restored his voice. Others say it was invented after World War I as a cheap, nutritious meal. Whatever the case, Gogol-Mogol is a go to remedy for many.

Prep time: 10 minutes

Cook time: 3 to 4 minutes

Yield: 1 serving

Ingredients

2 eggs yolks

2 tablespoons of sugar or 2 to 3 tablespoons of honey

1 cup milk

Directions

1. Mix the egg yolks with the sugar.

2. Heat the milk almost to a boil and remove from heat.

3. Slowly add the yolk and sugar mixture into the hot milk while vigorously whisking to prevent the eggs from cooking.

4. Serve in a mug and drink up.

Fire Cider

I stumbled upon fire cider at a fall festival several years ago. A young couple was giving away samples, suggesting a daily dose would keep you healthy. One swig of it cleared my sinuses, and I felt like I was breathing fire. They sell it under the name Shire City Herbals. I have used it effectively to ward off a sore throat by taking a swig every few hours until the symptoms go away. Feel free to check out their offerings. I, of course, knew I could find the recipe and have found it in a few reliable places, most notably in one of Rosemary Gladstar’s book, “Herbs for Common Ailments.” Here’s Gladstar’s recipe:

Prep time: 20 minutes

Cook time: 3 to 4 minutes

Total time: 3 to 4 weeks

Yield: 1 pint

Ingredients

1/4 cup grated horseradish

1 onion, chopped

1 head of garlic, peeled and chopped

2 tablespoons turmeric

1 quart mason jar

1 quart apple cider vinegar

1 cup honey

Cayenne pepper

Directions

1. Combine horseradish, onion, garlic and turmeric in a one-quart mason jar.

2. Heat the apple cider vinegar until it is warm, not hot. Pour into the mason jar and cover. Warming the cider hastens the process of drawing out the nutrients from the herbs.

3. Let stand for 3 to 4 weeks in a warm place. A sunny window would be perfect.

4. Strain and then add honey and a pinch or two of cayenne.

Sore Throat Elixir

There is nothing more simple, or more comforting, than Sore Throat Elixir made of lemon, hot water and honey. Credit: Carole Murko

There is nothing more simple, or more comforting, than Sore Throat Elixir made of lemon, hot water and honey. Credit: Carole Murko

And lest I forget my nana’s sore throat elixir! I don’t know what it is about old wives’ tales and concoctions, but many of them are useful and actually work. I, for one, will always go for a natural remedy as I think we are an over-prescribed, over-medicated society. I’ll stick to aspirin, chicken soup, and hot lemon and honey over NyQuil any day. For me, just one sip of hot lemon and honey starts the healing process and reminds me of my nana’s love. Perhaps it’s that combo that does the trick.

Prep time: 1 minute

Cook time: 10 minutes

Yield: 2 servings

Ingredients

1 lemon

1 to 2 cups of water

Honey

Directions

1. Place the lemon on a counter and roll it under the palm of your hand for 30 seconds to loosen the juice.

2.  Cut the lemon into quarters, squeeze the juice into a small pan; add the quarters.

3. Add a cup or two of water, and bring to a boil.

4. Put a tablespoon or any amount of honey you like (to taste) in a mug.

5. Pour hot lemon juice through a strainer into mug, stir and let the soothing begin!

Oregano Oil

One last remedy was shared by a dear friend last winter. He swears by oregano oil. When he feels the first twinge of a sore throat coming on, he puts 2 drops under his tongue. It’s strong and actually quite vile. I can again attest to its effectiveness. I have used it twice and it warded off the flu or cold. But be warned it is a tall order to stomach, and it’s not for the faint of heart. Hold your nose, pray to your higher power and hope for the best!

Main photo: Fire Cider is sure to remedy what ails you. Credit: Carole Murko

Read More
Make-Ahead Menu Lets You Party Like It’s 2015 Image

What does New Year’s Eve mean to you? Do you feel the need to party like it’s 1999? Or do you prefer an intimate gathering with friends? I have always looked at New Year’s Eve as amateur night. Somewhat of a forced party. I suppose that bias came from my parents’ attitude about New Year’s Eve. So, I seemed to avoid it like the plague.

But, admittedly, I always thought, maybe, just maybe I was missing out. Turns out the enjoyment quotient has less to do with the event and more to do with the people and your attitude. So with attitude adjustment in hand and a great group of friends, New Year’s Eve can be a splendid holiday to celebrate. What with the optimism of resolutions, or word of the year, or mapping out one’s desired feelings, it is indeed a time to embrace all that is new in 2015.

A New Year’s Eve get-together is a party or event that begins much later than most dinner parties. One of the things I learned from my mom was how to entertain simply and elegantly. For New Year’s Eve, a simple, yet sophisticated, do-ahead menu will allow you to enjoy your guests and ring in the new year with style. And in keeping with Heirloom Meals, I am sharing recipes that my mom, sister Jen and I have used, developed and refined over the years for various parties that we throw.

Easy Guac and Chips

Easy Guac and Chips
Picture 1 of 3

What's easier than Easy Guacamole, served with your choice of chips. Credit: Carole Murko

 Creative cheese platter — use several local cheeses, as well as olives, sliced fruit and nuts

Guacamole and chips

Beef Tenderloin en Croute With Mustard Sauce

Savory Sautéed Shrimp a la Jen

Arugula Salad With Mustard Vinaigrette

Mom’s Mystery Dessert

Prosecco

 

Easy Guacamole

Prep time: 10 minutes

Cook time: none

Total time: 10 to 15 minutes

Yield: 4 to 6, as a snack

Ingredients

1/2 jar of your favorite or homemade salsa

2 avocados, smashed

4 garlic cloves, minced

2 tablespoons cilantro, minced

Juice of 1/2 lime

1 or 2 drops of Tabasco sauce, optional

Directions

Mix ingredients together and enjoy with chips of your choice.

 

Beef Tenderloin en Croute With Mustard Sauce

Prep time: 5 minutes

Cook time: 30 minutes

Total time: 35 to 40 minutes

Yield: 6 to 8 servings

Ingredients

For the beef:

4 to 5 pound whole beef tenderloin, trimmed

1 to 2 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil

Salt and pepper to taste

Directions

1. Preheat oven to 500 F.

2. We like to oven sear our tenderloin, but you can also sear it on top of the stove. Rub tenderloin with olive oil, sprinkle with salt and pepper. Place on baking sheet and sear about 5 minutes per side, then reduce temperature to 350 F and bake for another 15 to 20 minutes. This should produce a spectrum of doneness from medium-rare in the middle to well-done on the ends.

3. Remove from pan, tent with foil, and let rest for about 20 minutes. Keep in mind: The beef will continue to cook. Once the filet is rested, you can slice it to desired thickness, about 1/2-inch thick for the en croute.

For en croute:

Loaf of french bread, sliced 1/2- to 3/4-inch thick

Extra virgin olive oil

Salt and pepper to taste

Directions

1. Preheat oven to 350 F.

2. Brush slices with olive oil and sprinkle with salt and pepper. Place on a parchment-lined baking sheet in the middle of the oven for about 5 minutes until lightly toasted. Remove to a rack, cool and store until ready to use.

For the mustard sauce:

1/2 cup dry mustard

3 tablespoons distilled white vinegar

1 1/2 teaspoons sugar

1 1/2 teaspoons salt

3 tablespoons water

6 tablespoons butter, cut into pieces

3 tablespoons fresh chives

Directions

1. Mix the mustard, vinegar, sugar, salt and water until it forms a smooth paste. Cover and let stand for about 10 minutes.

2. Put mixture into a double-boiler over simmering water and whisk in the butter until combined and smooth. Remove from heat and stir in the chives.

Note: Can be served warm or at room temperature. We put a small dollop on each beef en croute.

 

Savory Sautéed Shrimp a la Jen

Prep time: 30 to 35 minutes

Cook time: 5 to 10 minutes

Total time: 35 to 45 minutes

Yield: 6 to 8 servings

Ingredients

2 pounds shrimp, peeled, deveined, cleaned and dried

2 to 3 garlic cloves, minced

1 tablespoon rosemary, minced

1/4 cup parsley, minced

1 to 2 teaspoons crushed red pepper, to taste

1/4 cup capers

1/4 cup olive oil

Zest of one lemon

Salt and pepper to taste

2 tablespoons butter

Juice of one lemon

1/4 cup parsley, for garnish

Directions

1. Toss the shrimp with the garlic, rosemary, parsley, crushed red pepper, capers, olive oil, lemon zest, and salt and pepper. Cover and refrigerate for 4 hours or overnight.

2. Heat butter until foaming in a large skillet, add the shrimp and saute until cooked, about five minutes. Pour into your serving bowl, toss with lemon juice and parsley for garnish, if you’re using it. Can be served hot off the stove or at room temperature.

 

Mustard Vinaigrette

Prep time: 5 minutes

Cook time: none

Total time: 5 minutes

Yield: 1 cup

Ingredients

2 tablespoons apple cider vinegar

2 tablespoons Dijon mustard

6 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil

Salt and pepper to taste

Directions

Whisk together the vinegar and mustard until smooth and then add the olive oil, pouring in a stream to incorporate slowly, whisk until smooth.

Note: This dressing goes particularly well with a baby arugula salad.

 

Mom’s Mystery Dessert

Prep time: 10 to 15 minutes

Cook time: 25 minutes

Total time: 35 to 40 minutes, plus time to freeze (4+ hours)

Yield: 8 to 10 servings

Ingredients

2 cups packed brown sugar

2 eggs

2/3 cup of flour

1 cup chopped pecans

1 teaspoon baking soda

2 cups heavy cream

2 tablespoons brandy

Directions

1. Preheat oven to 350 F.

2. Coat a 9-by-13-inch baking dish with vegetable oil.

3. Mix together the brown sugar, eggs, flour, pecans and baking soda. Spoon the batter into the baking dish.

4. Bake for about 25 minute or until the tester comes out clean. Cool for about 2 hours.

5. Whip the heavy cream until soft peaks form and fold in the brandy.

6. Break the cake into small pieces and fold into the cream. Spoon the mixture into a clean 9-by-13-inch pan and spread evenly. Freeze until firm, about 4 hours or overnight. When ready to serve, spoon into goblets and serve.

Main photo: Beef Tenderloin en Croute With Mustard Sauce. Credit: Carole Murko

Read More
A Family Firmly Rooted In Thanksgiving Image

Heritage has many meanings, encompassing not only our cultural and ancestral connections, but also the breeds of livestock our forefathers raised. Carole Soule is that rare individual whose life intersects both. Carole is a 13th-generation Mayflower descendent whose family heritage is deeply tied to its origins and she is a farmer who raises heritage breed cattle as well.

Carole’s lineage began with George Soule, an indentured servant who survived the journey to Plymouth and became one of the signers of the Mayflower Compact. Carole notes the Soule genetics must be strong because there are about 30,000 Soules who trace their roots back to George. That is one prolific progeny.

Thanksgiving memories

Carole’s grandparents’ dining room table was the center of all the family holidays, especially Thanksgiving. The table took up the entire room, and one needed to skirt around the edge to get to the other side. To have a personal connection to the very first Thanksgiving was not lost on Carole or the Soule family. It was worn like a badge of honor. They are proud to share that they are connected to the origins of our country.

As a child, Carole recalls piling into her family’s tiny Renault , all three siblings squished in the back seat for the three-hour drive from Bedford, Mass., to Hillsdale, N.Y., where her grandparents, Ida and Charles Soule, lived. At Thanksgiving, the table was always piled high with food, but the dishes Carole remembers most are her grandmother’s homemade cranberry sauce and creamed onions. The cranberry sauce is simply equal amounts of cranberries and sugar with a little cornstarch. It is cooked until the cranberries are soft, then the dish is cooled.

The creamed onions, though, are Carole’s favorite. They are rich and thick, and all kinds of yummy.

Creamed Onions

Prep time: 15 to 20 minutes

Cook time: About 1 hour, 10 minutes

Total time: About 1 hour, 30 minutes

Yield: 8 to 10 servings

Ingredients

3 pounds fresh pearl onions

3 tablespoons olive oil

1 teaspoon salt

1/2 cup beef broth

2 tablespoons butter

1/4 cup all purpose flour

3 cups milk

1 bay leaf

1 teaspoon thyme

1/4 teaspoon pepper

2 teaspoons apple cider

Directions

1. Preheat oven to 375 F.

2. Peel onions and trim both ends.

3. Add 1 tablespoon of the olive oil and 1/4 teaspoon of the salt to the onions.

4. Layer onions in pan large enough to fit in one layer.

5. Place in oven; roast for about an hour, stirring occasionally, until onions are soft and brown in spots.

6. Remove the pan from the oven, add broth.

7. Roast for 10 minutes more.

For the cream sauce:

1. Melt butter and 2 tablespoons olive oil in large saucepan.

2. Add flour and whisk until the mixture bubbles and is free of lumps.

3. Add milk, bay leaf, thyme, pepper and salt.

4. Boil, whisking often. Thicken to consistency of thick gravy. Remove from heat. Discard the bay leaf.

5. Add the roasted onions and any broth from the pan to the cream sauce. Stir in apple cider.

6. Serve warm

Store3

Store3
Picture 1 of 6

The Miles Smith Farm store is solar powered and heated. Credit: Miles Smith Farm

Old-fashioned farm, cattle

It was those same car trips across the state of Massachusetts that began Carole’s love affair with cows. Across from her grandparents’ house was a pasture full of beautiful doe-eyed cows. Carole would visit with the “girls” whenever she could.

Fast-forward a few decades and Carole and her husband bought an 1850s farm called the Miles Smith Farm in New Hampshire. Her dream and vision was to go back to the old-fashioned way of raising animals She knew it would begin with an easy-to-raise heritage breed — the Scottish Highland. There would be no antibiotics, no corn. Just grass.

The Scottish Highland breed is hearty. The breed’s shaggy coat helps protect them from the elements, which means they don’t need a layer of fat to keep warm and, instead, produce lean beef that is low in cholesterol.

Carole’s herd is grass-fed, even in winter. She leaves many of her grass fields uncut for winter grazing. The cows paw through the snow to find their food. The breed is adaptable to a wide range of conditions and are equipped to forage and to live without shelter. Feeding on grass rather than hay also saves money, from the cost of fossil fuels to plant and harvest the hay to the cost of the seed. It is a perfect “circle of life,” too — while the cows are grazing, they are also fertilizing the field. Most hayfields are generally commercially fertilized, which costs more money.

Carole has found a win-win solution in this method. Plus, this heritage breed is well-suited to her state. The mountainous parts of New England are perfect places for these cattle because they can easily maneuver around the rocky outcroppings and graze on the hillsides, which are difficult to mow and cultivate.

Each year, the Miles Smith Farm slaughters 120 cows. They sell the meat through several channels: meat community supported agriculture (CSA) programs; wholesale customers including schools, regional hospitals and restaurants; and direct to consumers through their on-site, solar-powered store.

Carole has just received a USDA grant to work with a heritage pork farmer to create and sell a beef-pork mix. Carole shares that her new venture’s tagline is: “A burger that squeals with flavor.” She is again tapping into an old-fashioned tradition: Many people used to blend pork into their lean beef to create juiciness and flavor.

The Soule heritage is alive and well in Carole, in both namesake and familial traditions. Just as George Soule was drawn to a life in the New World, Carole has been drawn to a life on the land, an old-fashioned breed and traditional farming methods. Perhaps there is more to the Soule heritage than we will ever know. One thing is for sure, Carole is grateful for her heritage and her heritage cattle.

Main photo: Miles Smith Farm owners Carole Soule and Bruce Dawson, with Missy, a Scottish Highland breed cow. Credit: Miles Smith Farm

Read More
Thriving On Love And Olive Oil Image

Are olives an aphrodisiac? My research suggests they are not, but for Andrea Pupek and Fabio Cimicchi, they most certainly were. Andrea’s Global MBA thesis project, a comprehensive marketing plan for Fabio’s family olive oil business, resulted in love, marriage and now a vibrant olive oil export business, Caselle Italian Imports.

Andrea’s mother knew early on that Andrea would travel the globe when at 13 she became a student ambassador of People to People. Her parents provided her with roots and wings. Her roots were firmly planted in Western Massachusetts, and her wings took her to Italy.

Family’s pierogi ‘factory’

Andrea recalls the strong ties her family had to her paternal grandmother, her babci. Her favorite memory with her babci is what she calls “the Pupek family pierogi factory.” As with many family recipes, none were ever written for the pierogis. Andrea had the foresight when her babci started forgetting things at 92 years old to document and photograph the pierogi factory. A legitimate recipe now exists, and an indelible memory was forged between Andrea, her sister and their babci.

Family values were the centerpiece of Andrea’s upbringing. Even after her parents divorced they continued to celebrate the holidays together. This exceptional situation of support, love and respect was one Andrea would find among the olive groves in Orvieto, Italy.

Andrea’s thesis work took her to Italy — to the Cimicchi family — to develop a business and marketing plan for the export of their olive oil. She never imagined that one of the Cimicchis would become her husband or that she would call Orvieto home.

The transition she says was easy.

Fabio’s family’s values echoed hers. His family is emotionally and physically close, resembling what one might imagine a prototypical, multi-generational Italian family to be. Sunday lunches are a ritual. It anchors the family solidly in their generational traditions of meals that are simple, but long and delightful. There are multiple courses that include some form of roasted chicken, potatoes and, of course, a homemade pasta dish.

Marriage of family traditions

At the holidays, Andrea integrated her family’s Christmas cookie-making traditions into the Cimicchis’ traditions. When Andrea and Fabio traveled to the United States for the holidays, she made sure to include one of the Cimicchi family’s Christmas Eve favorites – chocolate spaghetti – in her family’s festivities. Imagine spaghetti with olive oil, chocolate, walnuts and sugar paste. Now that’s a decadent tradition worth importing.

olivegroveroad

olivegroveroad
Picture 1 of 7

Le Caselle, located in the Umbria region of Italy, has 195 acres of olive trees and vineyards (and Ozzy, the dog, keeps all of the animals on the estate in line). Credit: Andrea Pupek

The love affair has produced much more than the fusion of family values and food traditions. It has also resulted in the creation of Caselle Italian Imports. The Cimicchi family owns more than 195 acres of land, planted with more than 2,000 olive trees.

Le Caselle is located the between Orvieto and Castel Viscardo in the Umbria region, which is known for its olive oil and is frequently referred to as the green heart of Italy.

The Cimicchi family’s ties to Le Caselle date as far back as the 1700s when the family came to care for the land under Knight Guiscardo, who was himself hired to protect the land for the church. The land changed hands a few times among a small group of families, but Fabio’s great-grandfather Alessandro ended up owning the majority of the original Castel Viscardo estate. In 1984, Fabio’s parents purchased the rest of the family land that makes up the original Le Caselle estate from Uncle Guiseppe Cimicchi, with the goal to produce wine and olive oil.

Family’s olive oils

The Cimicchis produce two types of olive oil for sale: Madonna Antonia, which is made from 100% moraiolo olives, and Olio delle Caselle, their signature Umbrian blend. The blend is a closely held, secret family recipe perfected over several generations, using just the right proportions of moraiolo, leccino, frantoio and rajo olives. Olio delle Caselle has a golden color with a tinge of green.

When tasting the olive oil, Fabio told me to slurp the olive oil along with some air. Adding the air emulsifies the oil and allows it to spread across your entire mouth for a full taste bud experience. The taste was smooth and fresh, with a little spicy aftertaste. Delicious. It is perfect on young greens and tomatoes, in salad dressings and soups, and as a dip for crusty Italian bread.

With the matrimony of Andrea and Fabio, and the loving support of close family friends, Caselle Italian Imports was born. Andrea put her masters thesis to work, sharing the amazing fruits of the Cimicchis’ labors with the wider world. Caselle Italian Imports also offers other Italian specialty products, such as traditional balsamic vinegar from Modena.

Main photo: Recently harvested olives from the Cimicchi family’s Le Caselle estate in Italy. Credit: Andrea Pupek

Read More