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Clifford A. Wright won the James Beard/ KitchenAid Cookbook of the Year award and the James Beard Award for the Best Writing on Food in 2000 for "A Mediterranean Feast" which was also a finalist for the IACP Cookbook of the Year award. Saveur magazine chose the book for its Saveur 100 list. His book "Mediterranean Vegetables" was chosen one of the top ten Cookbooks of 2001 by the Chicago Tribune and his first cookbook, "Cucina Paradiso: The Heavenly Food of Sicily," was a "best book of 1992" in the New York Times Book Review’s Christmas List. He is the author of 16 books, of which 14 are cookbooks and a contributor to eight others. His latest book "One-Pot Wonders” was published by Wiley in 2013. Colman Andrews, former editor of Saveur magazine called Wright "the reigning English-speaking expert on the cuisines and culinary culture of the Mediterranean." As an independent food scholar he has lectured at the Center for European Studies at Harvard, the Center for Contemporary Arab Studies at Georgetown, the Rusk School for International Affairs at Davidson College, the Culinary Institute of America, and other universities. He also writes for food magazines such as Saveur, Gourmet, Fine Cooking, Food & Wine, and Bon Appétit and wrote all the food entries for Columbia University's "Encyclopedia of the Modern Middle East" and several entries for the “Oxford Companion to Sweets.” His scholarly articles on food have appeared in peer-review journals such as Gastronomica, Food and Foodways, and Al-Masaq: Islam and the Medieval Mediterranean Studia Arabo-Islamica Mediterranea.  Wright also writes for his own web sites, www.Cook-Coquus.com and www.cliffordawright.com.

Poetry and stories that will make you crave food and romance. Credit: Clifford A. Wright

The idea that foods have aphrodisiac properties is quite old and found in all cultures, but this notion has waned with the rise of

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Sunchokes (Jerusalem artichokes). Credit: Clifford A. Wright

Many cooks overlook the unusual vegetable called the Jerusalem artichoke, also known as the sunchoke. The best part of the sunchoke is the tuberous rhizomes

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Weisswurst and sauerkraut. Credit: Clifford A. Wright

German food can be quite inaccessible. Many people think of it as heavy or they aren't sure exactly what it is beyond sausages and

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Breakfast casserole with eggs, bacon, French bread and cheese. Credit: Clifford A. Wright

I no longer drink and therefore no longer need to deal with hangovers, but plenty of revelers do have to manage that problem on

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Roasted goose. Credit: Monica-photo/iStock

Classic holiday dishes are often associated with a specific religious holiday or cultural tradition. Sometimes this is so much so that meals get a

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Apple, Walnut and Maple Crisp. Credit: Clifford A. Wright

The craziness of the holidays often overwhelms the cook. We are worrying and wondering about so much that sometimes we just need to force

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Labne, the origination of what is marketed in the U.S. as "Greek" yogurt. Credit: Clifford A. Wright

I've been exploring Mediterranean food for decades and written books about it, but only recently have discovered the phenomena of Greek yogurt, which was

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Red flannel hash. Credit: Clifford A. Wright

We are concerned about species of animals that might be headed for extinction, but we don't seem to be as concerned about our endangered

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