Home / Articles Posted by Clifford A. Wright (Page 9)
Clifford Wright's Image
Clifford Wright 176POSTS

Clifford A. Wright won the James Beard/ KitchenAid Cookbook of the Year award and the James Beard Award for the Best Writing on Food in 2000 for "A Mediterranean Feast" which was also a finalist for the IACP Cookbook of the Year award. Saveur magazine chose the book for its Saveur 100 list. His book "Mediterranean Vegetables" was chosen one of the top ten Cookbooks of 2001 by the Chicago Tribune and his first cookbook, "Cucina Paradiso: The Heavenly Food of Sicily," was a "best book of 1992" in the New York Times Book Review’s Christmas List. He is the author of 16 books, of which 14 are cookbooks and a contributor to eight others. His latest book "One-Pot Wonders” was published by Wiley in 2013. Colman Andrews, former editor of Saveur magazine called Wright "the reigning English-speaking expert on the cuisines and culinary culture of the Mediterranean." As an independent food scholar he has lectured at the Center for European Studies at Harvard, the Center for Contemporary Arab Studies at Georgetown, the Rusk School for International Affairs at Davidson College, the Culinary Institute of America, and other universities. He also writes for food magazines such as Saveur, Gourmet, Fine Cooking, Food & Wine, and Bon Appétit and wrote all the food entries for Columbia University's "Encyclopedia of the Modern Middle East" and several entries for the “Oxford Companion to Sweets.” His scholarly articles on food have appeared in peer-review journals such as Gastronomica, Food and Foodways, and Al-Masaq: Islam and the Medieval Mediterranean Studia Arabo-Islamica Mediterranea.  Wright also writes for his own web sites, www.Cook-Coquus.com and www.cliffordawright.com.

Brussels sprouts for hash. Credit: Clifford A. Wright

Thanksgiving dinner in my family is not the time for experimentation. We have old favorites whose recipes we pull out because, after all, we

0
Cheese twists for a Thanksgiving appetizer. Credit: Clifford A. Wright

Long before the turkey comes out of the oven golden and glistening, our family has gathered, preparing all the myriad dishes, drinking, laughing and

0
Hominy (maize) is one of the ingredients in the authentic succotash recipe. Credit: Glane23 / Wikimedia Commons

That Thanksgiving belongs to New England goes without saying. Although there had been feasts giving thanks for the bounty of the land in the

0
Anchoïade salad with anchovies and tomatoes. Credit: Clifford A. Wright

Provence in the south of France has certainly gotten all the glory with its jet-setter reputation. After all it has the Riviera with Monte

0
Legumes, clockwise from top: chickpeas, brown lentils, red lentils (masoor dal), green gram (moong dal), black gram (urd dal), pigeon pea (red gram or toor dal). Credit: Clifford A. Wright

The variety of dried legumes used in Indian cooking can become quite mind-boggling. When you are in an Indian market, you may find yourself

0
Fish and chips for Red Sox fans. Credit: Clifford A. Wright

The 2013 World Series features a matchup between the Boston Red Sox and the St. Louis Cardinals. Many of us expect to spend a

0
Scrapple and eggs for breakfast. Credit: Clifford A. Wright

Scrapple is one of those regional American favorites that remain a mystery to outsiders. You'll find it in the mid-Atlantic states. Scrapple is a

0
Flowering kale. Credit: Clifford A. Wright

How kale went from a cellar-dwelling vegetable to a pennant-winning one is an interesting story full of ups and downs throughout history. When I started

0
BOOKS