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Nancy Harmon Jenkins is a recognized expert on Mediterranean cuisines and the Mediterranean Diet, out of which has evolved her deep interest in regional food systems. She is a food writer and journalist, with numerous books and articles to her credit, including “Virgin Territory: An Exploration of the World of Olive Oil” (Houghton). Her other food books include “The New Mediterranean Diet Cookbook” (Bantam), “Cucina del Sole: A Celebration of the Cuisines of Southern Italy,” “Flavors of Puglia,” “Flavors of Tuscany” and “The Essential Mediterranean,” examining a dozen foods key to understanding Mediterranean cuisines. A former staff writer with The New York Times, Nancy continues to contribute to the Times in addition to writing for The Washington Post, Saveur, Food & Wine, the Wall Street Journal and other national and international publications. She is currently working on “The Four Seasons of Pasta” (Viking), with her daughter Sara, chef-owner of Porsena Ristorante in New York City.

Jenkins has lived and worked throughout the countries of the Mediterranean, at various times making a home in Spain, France, Italy, Lebanon and Cyprus as well as in Hong Kong and England. She now divides her time between a Tuscan farmhouse, where she makes her own olive oil, and a home on the coast of Maine where she was born and raised. In Italy, Jenkins conducts weeklong seminars on the culture and cuisine of extra-virgin olive oil. (In 2014, these will take place in Puglia in the autumn; plans are afoot for programs in Sicily in the spring.)

Jenkins frequently conducts lectures and workshops about various aspects of the Mediterranean Diet, especially olive oil. You can read more of her writing on her site, nancyharmonjenkins.com.

In Israel for a few days, I've been hearing a lot about "the new Israeli cuisine." From my perspective, it seems firmly rooted in

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Tarte Tatin was invented, so we are told, late in the 19th century by one of the two Tatin sisters, les demoiselles Tatin, who

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The world of extra-virgin olive oil was thrown into turmoil recently by a report from the Olive Center at the University of California, Davis.

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On a spring Sunday when the Tuscan weather typically can't decide between sunshine or rain and gives us a bit of both, Panzano, in

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All around the northern rim of the Mediterranean early spring marks the tail end of artichoke season and the glorious appearance of fava beans.

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There was a black iron skillet in my mother's kitchen that she always called the spider. "Fetch me down that black iron spider," she

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  February is far and away the dreariest month of the year in Italy. Yes, for incurable optimists, there's a faint promise of spring in

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  It’s shrimp season in Maine. In these coldest days of winter, small, sweet, tender Maine shrimp -- aka Icelandic shrimp and Pandalus borealis --

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