Home / Articles Posted by Nancy Harmon Jenkins (Page 11)
Nancy Harmon Jenkins's Image
Nancy Harmon Jenkins 88POSTS

Nancy Harmon Jenkins is a recognized expert on Mediterranean cuisines and the Mediterranean Diet, out of which has evolved her deep interest in regional food systems. She is a food writer and journalist, with numerous books and articles to her credit, including “Virgin Territory: An Exploration of the World of Olive Oil” (Houghton). Her other food books include “The New Mediterranean Diet Cookbook” (Bantam), “Cucina del Sole: A Celebration of the Cuisines of Southern Italy,” “Flavors of Puglia,” “Flavors of Tuscany” and “The Essential Mediterranean,” examining a dozen foods key to understanding Mediterranean cuisines. A former staff writer with The New York Times, Nancy continues to contribute to the Times in addition to writing for The Washington Post, Saveur, Food & Wine, the Wall Street Journal and other national and international publications. She is currently working on “The Four Seasons of Pasta” (Viking), with her daughter Sara, chef-owner of Porsena Ristorante in New York City.

Jenkins has lived and worked throughout the countries of the Mediterranean, at various times making a home in Spain, France, Italy, Lebanon and Cyprus as well as in Hong Kong and England. She now divides her time between a Tuscan farmhouse, where she makes her own olive oil, and a home on the coast of Maine where she was born and raised. In Italy, Jenkins conducts weeklong seminars on the culture and cuisine of extra-virgin olive oil. (In 2014, these will take place in Puglia in the autumn; plans are afoot for programs in Sicily in the spring.)

Jenkins frequently conducts lectures and workshops about various aspects of the Mediterranean Diet, especially olive oil. You can read more of her writing on her site, nancyharmonjenkins.com.

Last week I promised to post two more thrifty Italian ways of dealing with leftover bread -- learning from the source about Italy’s cucina

0

Comes now January with its austere profile, severe and simple after the extravagances of the holidays, a time not of promise, but for promises

0

PORT CLYDE, Maine Lobstering never figured in Linda Bean's life plan. She got into the business fortuitously, rather late in life and through the back

0

My mother always made sure there was something to eat in our Christmas stockings, like an orange in the toe -- a reminder, she

0

Cold carrot soup garnished with cilantro. Photo credit: Nancy Harmon Jenkins Down in Andalucia, in the steamy south of Spain, no family refrigerator worth its size

0

Call me an East Coast cynic if you will, but I'm wondering about those drum rolls of praise for Outstanding in the Field (OITF),

0

Lobstermen have their own esoteric vocabulary. “Bugs” are what they call lobsters and “shedders” are bugs at their tenderest and, many argue, their most

0

When a lobster fisherman on the remote Maine island of Matinicus allegedly shot a fellow lobsterman point blank in the neck in broad daylight

0
BOOKS