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Robyn Eckhardt writes on food and travel in Asia and Turkey for The New York Times, Saveur, Australia's SBS Feast magazine and other publications. She writes a column on street food for Wall Street Journal Asia, is on the masthead at Travel+Leisure Southeast Asia and is a contributor to the forthcoming "Oxford Companion to Sweets."

Food, travel and street photographer David Hagerman has been shooting professionally for almost a decade. He has photographed in Asia, Europe and Turkey for Saveur, the Global New York Times, SBS Feast, Wall Street Journal Asia, Travel+Leisure and Food & Wine. He leads private and small-group food and travel photography workshops in Asia and Turkey.

Robyn and David collaborate on the food blog EatingAsia, which was named Editor's Choice for Best Culinary Travel Blog in Saveur's 2014 Food Blog Awards. They have lived in Asia for over 17 years and currently reside in Penang, Malaysia.

In 1998, Robyn and David visited Turkey for the first time. It was the beginning of an obsession with the country, its people and especially its food that has prompted many repeat visits. Over the years Robyn and David have driven over 11,000 miles along Turkey’s back roads in search of regional specialties. In 2016 Rux Martin Books/Houghton Mifflin Harcourt will publish their first cookbook, a collection of recipes, stories and images from Istanbul and off-the-beaten track eastern Turkey.

Twitter: @EatingAsia and @DaveHagerman

Smoky chicken sate plucked from a grill and dipped in sweet-spicy peanut sauce in a Jakarta alley. Steamed ground rice and jaggery cakes eaten

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A humble dish of village origins savored by royalty – that's or lam (sometimes spelled aw lahm), an enticing, spicy muddle of flavors and

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For fish lovers in Turkey, late autumn means one thing: hamsi, or anchovies. Sometime between mid- and late October the forefinger-length black and silver

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  If the cuisine of Laos is little known outside the country, then the cooking of Luang Namtha, its northernmost region, is all but invisible.

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In China, the residents of Chengdu, the capital of the country’s southwestern Sichuan province, are known as incomparable idlers. Lan, or "lazy," is the

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Van, in eastern Turkey, is known for its lake (the country's biggest), its ancient citadel (popularly known as the Rock of Van), and the

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Each year more than 200,000 tourists visit Luang Prabang in northern Laos. Most depart with memories of the UNESCO World Heritage site's orange-robed monks

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"Bir lira bir lira bir liraaa!" From behind a table heaped with bunches of tere (a jagged-edged variety of cress) a vendor at the weekly

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