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Cookbooks To Covet: IACP Names 2015 Award Finalists

All winners will be announced at the IACP annual conference March 27-30 in Washington, D.C.

All winners will be announced at the IACP annual conference March 27-30 in Washington, D.C.

There are more than 25,000 cookbook titles listed on Amazon. It’s certainly a buyer’s market. But which ones to buy, either for use in the kitchen or viewing on the coffee table?

The International Association of Culinary Professionals (IACP) — a worldwide forum for the exchange of information, knowledge and inspiration within the professional food and beverage community — last week narrowed the field for cookbook lovers with its selections of what it considers the best cookbooks published in 2014.

The awards program received more than 500 submissions in 20 categories, including American and international sweet and savory cooking; restaurant- and chef-centered books and those homing in on culinary travel; e-cookbooks and culinary history; and literary food writing and photography. The program is widely lauded as the most selective in the industry due to its two-tier judging process that requires recipe testing in all relevant categories.

One cookbook is selected as the Cookbook of the Year. All winners will be announced at the IACP annual conference March 27-30 in Washington, D.C.

This slideshow provides a snapshot of the finalists in each category.


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Photo collage: All winners will be announced at the IACP annual conference March 27-30 in Washington, D.C.



Zester Daily contributor Christine Burns Rudalevige, based in Brunswick, Maine, is an independent journalist and classically trained home cook working to spread reliable information about the state of food consumption. She writes copy and develops and tests recipes for many media, including Cooking Light, NPR.org's The Salt, Food52, WholeFoodsMarketCooking.com, Portland (Me.) Press-Herald, Philadelphia Inquirer and Pittsburgh Post-Gazette. In 2013, Rudalevige co-founded with Mollie Sanders, the Family Fish Project, a blog (www.familyfish.net), recipe site and cookbook project designed to help busy families cook and eat more seafood at home. As a chef instructor at Stonewall Kitchen in York, Maine, Rudalevige develops and teaches recreational cooking classes.

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