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Food Trends: What’s Old Will Become New Again In 2015

What new foods and dishes will appear on our plates in 2015? Credit: iStock

What new foods and dishes will appear on our plates in 2015? Credit: iStock

Pseudoscience and seductive headlines worked their black magic in 2014, enticing people to follow one misguided food fad after another. However, 2015 holds more promise.

We at Oldways — our nonprofit has spent the last quarter century guiding people to good health through heritage and cultural food traditions — predict that what’s old will be rediscovered in brand new ways. We see five food trends in our kitchens and on our dinner plates for the year ahead:

1. Whole grains become the new normal

Now that diners have discovered the nutty flavor and toothsome bite of whole grains, they are more willing to move from quinoa to more adventurous options like teff, sorghum and millet. Next up: Look for on-demand milled grains and more varieties of sprouted grains and sprouted grain flours, which will take baking to the next level.

2. African heritage cuisine goes mainstream

Thanks to chefs such as Marcus Samuelsson and Bryant Terry, as well as food historians such as Jessica B. Harris, African heritage cuisine has been elevated to new ranks. Based on whole, fresh plant foods, with a special emphasis on leafy greens, the traditional healthy eating patterns of African heritage, with roots in America, Africa, the Caribbean and South America, are making their way to more and more menus. In turn, more diners are discovering these healthy traditions of Africa. That’s also encouraging home cooks to explore and experiment with dishes like African peanut soup, Hoppin’ John and Jollof rice (also known as benachin).

3. All hail plants!

Interest in plant-based diets has reached an all time high. The trend has grown beyond just replacing meat. Today, vegetables are celebrated with innovative plant-centric plates such as zucchini baba ganoush and cauliflower steaks. In 2015, a number of less well known vegetable varieties will pop up at farmer’s markets, on more menus and on more plates. Look for tat soi and turnip greens as well as new and delicious hybrid vegetables like BrusselKale, a combination of two of America’s favorites.

Sara Baer-Sinnott, president of Oldways, a nonprofit food and nutrition education organization, sees five food patterns in the year ahead. Credit: Courtesy Oldways

Sara Baer-Sinnott, president of Oldways, a nonprofit food and nutrition education organization, sees five food patterns in the year ahead. Credit: Courtesy of Oldways

We will move beyond butternut to an amazing assortment of other squash: kabocha, delicata and sweet dumpling. Root vegetables such as rutabaga, watermelon radishes, purple potatoes and parsnips, also will rule. Even the U.S. government is considering a recommendation to eat more plant foods and less meat in the 2015 Dietary Guidelines.

4. Will it blend?

Home cooks looking to amp up the flavor are turning to herbs and spices with a twist.  Spice blends like Berbere, Baharat, Ras el Hanout and Herbes de Provence (from Ethiopia, the Middle East, North Africa and France respectively) are adding adventure in the kitchen. Cooks are discovering the allure of blending their own spices. And they’re taking cues from top chefs like Ana Sortun of the celebrated Cambridge-based Oleana. Not only do these home blends boost flavor without adding sodium or calories, they enable personalized flavor preferences.

5. Cultural condiments

The arts of preserving and fermenting foods — popular in traditional diets around the world — were originally created simply to extend the life of foods in a world without refrigeration. Today, more home cooks are learning these techniques and padding their pantries with homemade kimchi, craft pickles, sauerkraut and preserved lemons.

Main photo: What new foods and dishes will appear on our plates in 2015? Credit: iStock



Zester Daily Soapbox contributor Sara Baer-Sinnott is the president of Oldways, a Boston-based nonprofit food and nutrition education organization. Oldways' mission is to guide people to good health through cultural food traditions and lifestyles, using practical and positive programs grounded in science. Simply put: We advocate for the healthful pleasures of real food. Oldways is the parent organization for the Whole Grains Council, the Cheese of Choice Coalition and the Mediterranean Foods Alliance, and is well-known for creating the Whole Grain Stamp and the Mediterranean Diet Pyramid.

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