The Culture of Food and Drink


Home / Cooking  / Ramen Breaks Out Of The Bowl With This Noodle Salad

Ramen Breaks Out Of The Bowl With This Noodle Salad

Ramen Salad With Roasted Eggplant and Shisito Peppers. Credit: Cheryl D. Lee

Ramen Salad With Roasted Eggplant and Shisito Peppers. Credit: Cheryl D. Lee

Ramen noodles, the staple found in college dorms worldwide. As a student, my future culinary career was not even a thought, but I learned to dress up my ramen noodles, which I would buy whenever there was a “10 for $1” special at the local supermarket.

There was an entire repertoire of ramen dishes that I made:

  • Ramen soup with frozen peas
  • Ramen soup with frozen corn
  • Ramen soup with frozen peas and corn
  • Ramen soup with leftover chicken
  • Ramen soup with deli meat
  • Stir-fried ramen noodles with hot dogs
  • Stir-fried ramen noodles with spam
  • Stir-fried ramen noodle with frozen peas and corn and spam

You get the idea, cheap and filling. It was and is every broke college student’s idea of a bargain answer.

But the packaged, sodium-laden noodles you find in the average supermarket aisle are not where the ramen noodle story ends. It is not even where it begins.

Ramen noodles have been a staple of the Japanese diet for ages, usually prepared as a soup. But ramen noodles are much more versatile than that, lending themselves to pan frying a la yakisoba, or in a salad such as this one below.

Four ramen types near you

In major cities, you can find authentic ramen restaurants serving incredible bowls of soup, layered with flavors. In Japan, each region has a special way of preparing ramen, but there are four types that are found everywhere.

Shio or salt: Originally made with sea salt, this is a lighter, clear broth often served with chicken or seafood.

Shoyu or soy sauce: Used to flavor lighter broths and heavier, dense broths.

Miso: Salty, fermented miso paste makes a thick, sweet and salty broth, robust enough to stand up to fatty pork belly.

Tonkotsu or pork broth: Creamy, slightly cloudy pork broth. Thick with umami flavor, with an unctuous mouth feel, it is comfort in a bowl.

Toppings for ramen soup cover all taste preferences, including but not limited to pressed fish cakes, mushrooms and fungi, pickled ginger, seafood, fresh and dried seaweed, braised pork belly and soft boiled eggs.

Lee_Peppers

Lee_Peppers
Picture 1 of 4

Shisito peppers. Credit: Cheryl D. Lee

Ramen has broken out of its soup bowl and become so mainstream a chef has substituted a hamburger bun with a ramen noodle bun. The Ramen Burger is actually quite tasty, with a sweet shoyu glaze, arugula and scallions.

Chefs realize that the unique process of making ramen noodles is what makes their texture ideal in dishes other than soup. Ramen noodles are made using Kansui, or alkaline water, which results in a firm and chewy noodle that will not become mushy or sticky.

This salad uses sweet baby eggplant and mild shishito peppers, but almost any kind of vegetable or meat can be substituted. Experiment with adding roasted kabocha squash, snow peas, shredded carrots, steamed Chinese broccoli, bok choy, leftover chicken, pork, fish or shrimp. Boiled eggs, tofu or seitan make great vegetarian meat substitutes.

Ramen Salad With Roasted Eggplant and Shishito Peppers

Prep time: 5 minutes

Cook time: 45 minutes

Yield: 6 servings

Ingredients

1 pound Indian or baby eggplant, stem removed and halved

½ pound Shishito peppers

2 tablespoons olive or vegetable oil

½ teaspoon fine sea salt

2 bundles (3 ounces) ramen noodle

¼ cup sweet soy sauce (kecap manis)

2 tablespoons mirin

1 tablespoon lime juice

2 teaspoons Yuzu No Sui juice

1 tablespoon sesame seeds, toasted

Directions

1. Heat the oven to 400 degrees F.

2. Place the eggplant and Shishito peppers onto a sheet pan.

3. Drizzle the olive oil and sprinkle the salt over the vegetables.

4. Toss to coast evenly with the oil and salt.

5. Arrange the eggplant halves cut side down on the pan.

6. Roast the vegetables for 30 to  40 minutes, until the peppers are lightly charred and the eggplant is soft.

7. Let the vegetables cool. (Can be made a day ahead)

8. Pull the stems from the peppers, and then slice into rings.

9. Cut the eggplant into small pieces.

10. Place the peppers and eggplant into a large bowl.

11. Cook the ramen noodles according to package directions.

12. Drain the ramen, then rinse with cold water to cool them.

13. Add the noodles to the bowl with the vegetables.

14. In a small bowl whisk together the sweet soy, mirin, lime juice and Yuzu juice.

15. Pour the dressing over the noodles and vegetables, tossing to coat.

16. Add the sesame seeds, toss again to mix well.

17. Refrigerate until ready to serve.

Main photo: Ramen Salad With Roasted Eggplant and Shisito Peppers. Credit: Cheryl D. Lee



Zester Daily contributor Cheryl D. Lee began her culinary training at the California Culinary Academy in San Francisco, then moved to New York, where among many roles she worked on Chef Emeril Lagasse's cooking show "Emeril Live," became the Assistant Test Kitchen Director at Woman's World magazine, and served as a chef and catering manager in the city's cafés. Returning to her native California, she has served as chef instructor at the California School of Culinary Arts and styled food on the sets of television's "Friends" and "The Bold and the Beautiful." She is the recipe developer, food stylist, photographer and chief dishwasher for her blog, Black Girl Chef's Whites, focusing on real food, developed by a classically trained chef, that anyone can make.

NO COMMENTS

POST A COMMENT