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New Vinho Verde Wines Pair With Spring Food

A new style of Vinho Verde wines is emerging, and it’s perfect for springtime sipping. Credit: Copyright 2015 Tina Caputo

A new style of Vinho Verde wines is emerging, and it’s perfect for springtime sipping. Credit: Copyright 2015 Tina Caputo

Portugal is famous for producing two styles of wine that couldn’t be more different: Port and Vinho Verde. Port is known as a wine for winter — rich and warming, perfect for fireside sipping. Vinho Verde is the yin to Port’s yang — light, fresh and (typically) white. Vinho Verde is a wine for spring.

With a name that translates to “green wine,” in reference to its youth and freshness, Vinho Verde comes from the rainy region of the same name in the northwest corner of Portugal. While reds and rosés are also made there, Vinho Verde wines are primarily white. Known for their crispness, acidity and light effervescence, the wines are naturally low in alcohol and usually priced under $10.

The new Vinho Verde

New vineyard locations and farming practices are resulting in higher-quality, more-complex Vinho Verde wines. Credit: Copyright 2015, Courtesy of Wines of Portugal

New vineyard locations and farming practices are resulting in higher-quality, more-complex Vinho Verde wines. Credit: Copyright 2015, Courtesy of Wines of Portugal

While those cheap-and-cheerful wines are still plentiful, a new style of Vinho Verde wines is emerging alongside them. Like their traditional cousins, these wines are crisp and refreshing, yet they’re drier, riper and more mature in character. Their alcohol levels are low compared to many other whites, but at 12%, they’re a bit higher than the traditional 8% or 9% for Vinho Verde. Prices also have gone up, from about $7 a bottle to a still-affordable range of $11 to $20.

Another notable change is that producers are starting to showcase single-grape varieties such as Alvarinho, Loureiro and Trajadura, which were traditionally blended together.

This new approach is the result of a campaign by the region’s viticulture commission to encourage growers to plant in new locations, and improve their farming practices. Instead of using the old pergola trellis systems, growers are wire-training the vines on more modern systems. Rather than planting on the valley floors, they’re planting on slopes. The result has been a remarkable increase in the quality and complexity of the wines.

Wines for spring dishes

Vinho Verde wines are delicious with shellfish and other light spring dishes. Credit: Copyright 2015 Tina Caputo

Vinho Verde wines are delicious with shellfish and other light spring dishes. Credit: Copyright 2015 Tina Caputo

The great thing about the new-wave Vinho Verde wines is that they’re still wonderful for spring sipping. Not laden down with heavy oak, the wines pair beautifully with warm-weather dishes, including salads, shellfish and grilled fish. In Portugal, where fabulous fresh seafood is plentiful, Vinho Verde is often served with grilled sardines, arroz de marisco (seafood rice) and clams cooked in a cataplana.

Here are four delicious Vinho Verde wines to help you ring in spring:

Loureiro

Loureiro. Credit: Copyright 2015 Tina Caputo

Loureiro. Credit: Copyright 2015 Tina Caputo

Quinta de Gomariz Loureiro 2014 ($13): Made from the Loureiro grape, this wine has a spicy, floral aroma. It has fresh citrus notes on the palate, accented with spice and a bit of orange peel flavor on the finish.

Via Latina

Via Latina. Credit: Copyright 2015 Tina Caputo

Via Latina. Credit: Copyright 2015 Tina Caputo

Vercoope Via Latina Loureiro 2014 ($18): This wine has lovely aromas of green apples and citrus, with light floral notes. It’s fresh and crisp, with citrus and green apple flavors, and just a bit of tropical fruit. It’s nicely balanced, with bright acidity.

Aromas das Castas

Aromas das Castas. Credit: Copyright 2015 Tina Caputo

Aromas das Castas. Credit: Copyright 2015 Tina Caputo

Aromas Das Castas Alvarinho-Trajadura 2014 ($12): With a fresh, peachy aroma, this wine is slightly spritzy, with tangy citrus and peach flavors. It has a nice long finish, with a note of lemon zest.

Casa de Vilacetinho

Casa de Vilacetinho. Credit: Copyright 2015 Tina Caputo

Casa de Vilacetinho. Credit: Copyright 2015 Tina Caputo

Casa de Vilacetinho 2013 ($11): A blend of Avesso, Arinto, Azal and Loureiro grapes, this wine has citrus and tropical fruit aromas. It’s off-dry and a little bit fizzy, with stone fruit and citrus flavors.

Main photo: A new style of Vinho Verde wines is emerging, and it’s perfect for springtime sipping. Credit: Copyright 2015 Tina Caputo

More from Zester Daily:

» The little-known French wine perfect for spring

» A spring value wine from Spain

» Port wine is a great excuse for a tasting party

» Portugal’s vibrant white wine


Zester Daily contributor Tina Caputo is a wine, food and lifestyle writer based in Northern California. Her stories have also appeared in the San Francisco Chronicle, Wine Review Online, VisitCalifornia.com and Sonoma magazine. 

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