Home / Drinking  / Is Tea The New Black? Vendors And Buyers Jam Expo

Is Tea The New Black? Vendors And Buyers Jam Expo

Meng Yang of China’s Fuijan Chunlun Tea Group presents a traditional tea pour at the 12th annual World Tea Expo. Credit: © Seth Joel

Meng Yang of China’s Fuijan Chunlun Tea Group presents a traditional tea pour at the 12th annual World Tea Expo. Credit: © Seth Joel

In an annual rite, tea professionals from around the globe gather each year at the World Tea Expo to unveil new products, attend workshops and network with their peers. With the United States now the second largest tea importer, this year’s show was held in Long Beach, Calif., attracting an estimated 200 exhibitors and 4,000 buyers.

world-tea-expo©seth-joel-002

world-tea-expo©seth-joel-002
Picture 1 of 10

At World Flavorz Spice & Tea Company's booth, the aroma of rose petal, lavender, marigold, cornflower, apple and papaya was intoxicating. Credit: © Seth Joel

As people sifted through bins of loose tea, aromas filled the air at the expo. Like wine connoisseurs, they had their own jargon — such as “dirty socks” and “swamp” to describe the blends. I followed my nose to the World Flavorz Spice & Tea Company booth. The Malibu-based wholesaler specializes in teas that blend notes of fruit with floral fragrances. With names like Green Tea Lavender Rose and Island Paradise it’s easy to imagine why some call tea “the new black.”

Of course, not everything was new. Few things are more artistic — or traditional — than the Chinese tea ceremony. Meng Yang of China’s Fujian Chunlun Tea Group brewed a delicate green tea using the Chaou method. It uses cooler water, which helps maintain the tea’s integrity for tastings when viewing and sniffing are important.

Back amid the vendor hubbub, wholesalers showed off sexy new brew bottles, traditional clay teapots, single pot drippers, digital gooseneck kettles, infusion tea pitchers, bag-less tea and disposable tea infusers. The goodies went on and on. You may see some of them the next time you visit a local tea house. While you’re there, remember to use words like dirty socks and swamp.

Main photo: Meng Yang of China’s Fujian Chunlun Tea Group presents a traditional tea pour at  the 12th annual World Tea Expo. Credit: © Seth Joel



Zester Daily contributor Seth Joel has been a professional photographer since he was 21. Seth’s first major project was to set up a studio in the Forbidden City in Beijing and photograph the famous Terracotta Army for the Metropolitan Museum of Art. He went on to shoot and publish books for Time Inc., Harry N. Abrams, Alfred Knopf, Amphoto and Smithsonian. You can see more of his work on his website.

NO COMMENTS

POST A COMMENT