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It’s Raining Fish? Monsoon Brings A Boon To South India

Fishing in the South Indian chaakaras during monsoon season. Credit: Prasanth Gulfu

Fishing in the South Indian chaakaras during monsoon season. Credit: Prasanth Gulfu

The southwest monsoons arrive in Kerala with all their fury by mid-June every year. For the following 2½ months, raging seas, heavy rainstorms and rumbling thunder reign. Monsoon is also the lifeline of the region where food production and harvesting are still deeply seasonal. It is the time of renewal of the life cycle of farming and monsoon fishing.

The strong winds and high waves during monsoon season make it impossible even for fishermen with motorized trawlers to go out into the deep sea. But for the artisanal fishermen in Kerala, the early days of monsoon are the much-awaited time for Chaakara, the mud bank formations that arise along the coast within a few days after the onset of southwest monsoons. Chaakara is a welcome geological occurrence that happens only along Kerala’s coast in India.

Chaakara, or mud bank formation

The violent winds and strong ocean currents created by the monsoon winds stir the bottom of the sea, and fine mud particles are churned up into a thick suspension. The southerly currents that run parallel to the coast at maximum speed drive the entire floating mud slowly towards the shore. A semicircular boundary develops around the suspended mud, which consistently absorbs the wave energy and substantially reduces turbulence. Kerala has an intricate network of interconnected rivers, canals, lakes and inlets including five large lakes linked by canals, fed by more than 40 rivers that extend virtually half the length of the state.

During monsoon rains, clay and silts rich in silica and organic matter are washed down from the mountains and are carried down the rivers to the lakes and then on to the sea. Muddy water attracts a wide variety of fish, shrimp and prawns in abundance, and they surge to the surface from the bottom of the sea where they normally live. The tranquil waters inside the mud bank turns into a bustling fishing harbor.

Kerala’s fisheries and aquaculture resources are rich and diverse, and Kerala accounts for 20% to 25% of the national marine fish production. Fish catches from the state include more than 300 species, such as sardine, mackerel, seer fish, pomfret and prawn.

Artisanal monsoon fishing

Chaakara is the seasonal windfall for artisanal fishermen. Heavy surf and turbulent waters are dangerous for small canoes and catamarans and fishing in the artisanal sector is generally at a standstill during the monsoon. Thousands of fishermen from the surrounding areas rush to the fishing village where Chaakara has surfaced. In this safe and hospitable environment they harvest shoals of fish from their traditional fishing canoes. During the short-lived chaakara season the shore is lined with fishing canoes and catamarans and fishermen landing, sorting and selling a wide variety of fish. A single throw of nets enables them to bring home a miraculous bumper harvest of mackerel, prawns, sardines and others. Seafood processors and exporters buy up the bumper crop and cash in on the abundance. The price of seafood drops to attractive levels.

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Fish caught in a chaakara in South India. Credit: Prasanth Gulfu

The breeding season of the majority of the fish varieties coincides with the south-west monsoon season in Kerala, and it is essential that trawling is stopped during this period because it destroys fish eggs and young fish. The trawling ban is also necessary to ensure the safety of fishermen as the seas turn very rough during the monsoon.

Kerala has pioneered a fisheries management technique, an annual 45-day ban on trawling in the state’s waters during the monsoon season since 1988, for the long-term conservation of marine resources. This ban creates a major boon for artisanal fishermen because they get exclusive rights to fish in the vicinity of mud banks during this period.

The chemistry of chaakara

Chaakara is a unique phenomenon that happens along a stretch of nearly 270 kilometers (160 miles) along the Kerala coastline. At times these mud banks run several kilometers long, taking on the size of a lake. After a few weeks the fluid mud settles at the bottom, dissipating the mud bank. The mud bank formation is erratic and varies from year to year, in location, extent and duration.

One theory about the abundance of marine life close to the shore is that the muddy waters at the bottom of the sea contain less oxygen, so fishes and prawns that live at the bottom of the sea swim up to the surface to catch a breath. Veteran fishermen have a different take. They believe the rich nutrients from the mountains carried down by the rivers and backwaters attract fishes to the calm area formed in the sea.

Whatever the reason, it’s the perfect time to take advantage and make dishes served up by the monsoon’s bounty.

Prawn Cutlets

The following recipe is adapted from “The Essential Kerala Cookbook” by Vijayan Kannampilly

Ingredients

1 pound medium-sized prawns

¼ cup rice flour

Salt to taste

3 to 4 green chili peppers thinly sliced (less for milder taste)

1½ inch piece of fresh ginger grated

⅓ cup thinly chopped shallots

¼ cup curry leaves, thinly chopped

2 cups of oil, preferably coconut oil

Directions

1. Shell and remove heads of the prawns. Devein them and wash well. Place the prawns in a pan along with ½ cup of water and cook till tender. Remove from the stove, drain any remaining water and cool.

2. Grind or mince the prawns in a food processor. Add rice flour, salt, green chilies, ginger, shallots and curry leaves, and mix well. Divide the mixture into small 1-inch round balls and shape into round cutlets.

3. Meanwhile heat the oil in a frying pan to 350 F. Deep-fry the cutlets till both sides are golden brown. Serve hot.

Top photo: Fishing in the South Indian chaakaras during monsoon season. Credit: Prasanth Gulfu



Zester Daily contributor Ammini Ramachandran is a Texas-based author, freelance writer and culinary educator who specializes in the culture, traditions and cuisine of her home state of Kerala, India. She is the author of "Grains, Greens, and Grated Coconuts: Recipes and Remembrances of a Vegetarian Legacy" (iUniverse 2007), and her website is www.peppertrail.com.

8 COMMENTS
  • Neeru Biswas 8·6·13

    Fascinating piece! I could almost hear the waters gurgling and roaring.

  • Ammini Ramachandran 8·6·13

    Thank you Neeru Biswas

  • Rathi 8·7·13

    Interesting. I never knew these details about chakara.

  • Archisman Mozumder 8·14·13

    Nice article. Reminds me of a nice song from a famous Malayali movie of the 1960-s – ‘Chemmeen’. Here’s the link to the song during ‘chaakara’:

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9lswDCuLwh8

  • Ammini Ramachandran 8·14·13

    Thank you Rathi and Archisman Mozumder. Thank you for the link to the chaakara song Mr. Mozumder. Words can describe chaakara only so much; but the pictures in the video speak volumes about the impact of chaakara for the fishermen of Kerala.

  • Godan Nambudiripad 8·14·13

    I had heard about chaakara and knew that is about a healthy harvest of ocean fish etc. This gives a context and explantion. Very good article.

  • Ammini Ramachandran 8·14·13

    Thank you Godan Nambudiripad.

  • sunil 9·11·15

    very good article

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