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Pineapple Cake Goes Right Side Up

Pineapple-butterscotch cake. Credit: Charles Perry

Pineapple-butterscotch cake. Credit: Charles Perry

In the beginning, there was the pineapple, and it was good — very, very good, about as good as anything ever gets. But if you didn’t live in pineapple country, it was hard to obtain ones perfectly ripe and in good condition. Then there was canned pineapple, and though it might not have been quite as good as fresh pineapple, it was still pretty darned good. In fact, it begat one of the great creations of the 20th-century American kitchen: the pineapple upside-down cake. Its informing flavor came from the caramelization of the slices that lay on the bottom of the cast-iron frying pan while the cake baked on top.

But then fresh, ripe pineapple became more readily available, and people got tired of dealing with cast-iron pans, and anyway, new pineapple dishes had come along (hello, tiki cuisine). In the 1960s, the pineapple upside-down cake faded away.

Finally, in our own time, chefs discovered the idea of roasting pineapple and started roasting pineapple all over the place, and it was good. It was good for the same reason that pineapple upside-down cake had been good: Pineapple goes wonderfully well with caramelized flavors.

You don’t have to roast the fruit to get the same effect. You can even combine fresh or canned pineapple and butterscotch to get that old-fashioned caramelized flavor. This recipe is based on a pineapple-coconut cake in Nancie McDermott’s “Southern Cakes” (Chronicle Books, 2007). It’s kind of frivolous, but it is good.

Butterscotch-Pineapple Cake

Prep time: About 30 minutes

Cooking time: 30-35 minutes

Total time: About 1 hour

Yield: 1 two-layer cake, 6 to 8 servings

Ingredients

For the cake:

About 1/4 cup butter and 3 tablespoons flour for coating pans

3 cups cake flour

2 teaspoons baking powder

1/2 teaspoon salt

1 cup milk

1 teaspoon vanilla

1/2 pound (2 sticks) unsalted butter, softened

2 cups sugar

4 eggs

For the butterscotch-pineapple filling:

3 tablespoons plus 1 teaspoon flour

3 tablespoons sugar

1 20-ounce can crushed pineapple or 1 1/2 cups crushed fresh pineapple with liquid

3 tablespoons butter

1/3 cup butterscotch bits

For the frosting:

2 egg whites

1 cup sugar

1 tablespoon light corn syrup

2/3 cup pineapple juice, reserved from filling

Optional: 2 or 3 drops of yellow food coloring

For the assembly:

1/3 cup butterscotch bits

Directions

For the cake: 

1. Preheat the oven to 350 F.

2. Smear the interior of two 9-inch cake pans generously with butter. Line the bottom of the pans with 9-inch rounds of parchment paper or waxed paper and butter them (this step is optional, but it will help you to remove the cake layers intact). Sprinkle the interior of the pans with about 1 1/2 tablespoons flour each and shake around to coat; overturn the pans above your sink and tap to remove excess flour.

3. In a bowl, mix the 3 cups flour, baking powder and salt and set aside. In a separate bowl, mix the milk and vanilla and set aside.

4. Using an electric mixer, beat the softened butter at high speed in a mixing bowl until light and lemon-colored. Continue beating the butter and slowly add the 2 cups sugar. When the mixture is smooth, about 2 minutes, add the eggs one at a time, beating for 20 seconds after each addition and then scraping down the sides of the bowl with a spatula or wooden spoon.

5. Scoop in 1 cup of the flour mixture and beat at medium speed until the flour is just incorporated. Add half of the milk-vanilla mixture and beat at high speed until incorporated, gently urging all the ingredients together with a spatula. Repeat, alternating flour and milk, until the batter is just incorporated.

6. Scrape the batter into the prepared baking pans, smooth the tops and place in the oven. When the surface has just started to brown, 30 to 35 minutes, give the center a gingerly touch to see whether it has set — it should spring back. (The layers are definitely done when they start to pull away from the sides of the pan, but by that time they may be a little dry.)

7. Remove the pans from the oven and let them rest on racks or folded dish towels for 10 minutes. Set a plate or another rack on top of each pan and overturn it; the layer should pull away at a tap. Overturn the layers again so they’re right side up and let them cool for 20 or 30 minutes.

For the filling:

1. Stir the flour into the sugar.

2. Drain and squeeze the pineapple, reserving 2/3 cup of pineapple juice for use in the frosting.

3. In a small saucepan over medium heat, melt the butter and butterscotch bits. Add the sugar-flour mixture and stir until incorporated. Add the crushed pineapple and stir until thickened, about 5 minutes.

For the frosting:

1. Put the egg whites, sugar, corn syrup and pineapple juice in the top of a double boiler. Put about 1½ inches of water in the bottom of the double boiler and, over high heat, bring it to a boil. Meanwhile beat the frosting ingredients with an electric beater for 1 minute.

2. When the water has reached a full boil, set the top of the double boiler over the bottom, reduce the heat to medium-high and start beating again. After about 7 minutes, the frosting will start to lose its sheen and to form stiff peaks when the beaters are lifted from it.

3. Remove from the heat, add food coloring if desired and beat for 1 minute longer.

To assemble the cake:

1. Place one cake layer on your serving dish with the flat side up. Spread half of the butterscotch-pineapple filling over it, almost to the edge.

2. Set the other layer on top of the first and spread the rest of the filling over the top and sides of the cake. Sprinkle the butterscotch bits as evenly as possible across the top.

Main photo: Pineapple-Butterscotch Cake. Credit: Charles Perry



Zester Daily contributor Charles Perry is a former rock 'n' roll journalist turned food historian who worked for the Los Angeles Times' award-winning Food section, where he twice was a finalist for the James Beard award.

1 COMMENT
  • laura 12·10·14

    this sounds delicious and I can’t wait to try it…. but the assembly is confusing as it says to put half the filling in the center and half on top, but nowhere mentions the frosting. I am assuming all the filling goes in the center and all the frosting goes on top? I am not sure that the frosting should go over the filling and it doesn’t look like that in the photo.

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