Home / Cooking w/recipe  / 5 Sauces To Ramp Up A Steak Sandwich

5 Sauces To Ramp Up A Steak Sandwich

Heaven is a summer steak sandwich with a tasty sauce. Credit: Copyright 2015 TheWeiserKitchen

Heaven is a summer steak sandwich with a tasty sauce. Credit: Copyright 2015 TheWeiserKitchen

It’s pretty darn easy to take even somewhat modestly priced cuts of meat from good to great by grilling — and saucing. Sure, how you prep in advance counts. A concentrated 24-hour marinade for the meat is a great bet. A long, lingering overnight rub creates a crust. I love both methods and use them often. But that requires one ingredient I don’t always have, and I bet you don’t either: time.

Having a busy life doesn’t mean compromising on taste. It’s all about finding, transforming and using great last-minute flavors. That means great sauces.

Here are some new sauces ready to take that steak into prime time. Make all of them and set up a bar. They each make about 1 cup, which leaves room for leftovers, and last up to three days if covered and refrigerated.

Amontillado Sherry Romesco Sauce

Romesco sauce is from the Catalan region of Spain. Credit: Copyright 2015 TheWeiserKitchen

Romesco sauce is from the Catalan region of Spain. Credit: Copyright 2015 TheWeiserKitchen

Looking toward Spain? How about an Amontillado Sherry Romesco from the Catalan region? Often made with roasted peppers and tomato, this version is creamy from roasted garlic, deeply flavored from the toasting of the almonds and a bit off the beaten path as a result of the balancing act of Amontillado sherry and sherry vinegar. I double this recipe and use it as a dip for all sorts of grilled vegetables, and even as a pasta sauce with crumbled sheep’s or goat’s milk cheese. By the way, this sauce is vegan and genuinely versatile

Prep time: 5 minutes

Cook time: 50 minutes

Total time: 55 minutes (if using roasted garlic and roasted peppers, total time is less than 10 minutes)

Yield: About 1 cup

Ingredients

3 tablespoons olive oil

2 heads garlic

1/2 cup blanched almonds, finely ground

3 roasted red peppers, best-quality store-bought or homemade (see Kitchen Tips), peeled, seeded, coarsely chopped

1/4 cup dry Amontillado sherry

2 tablespoons sherry vinegar

1 teaspoon piment d’Espelette (see Kitchen Tips)

1 teaspoon smoked sweet paprika, pimentón de la Vera preferred (see Kitchen Tips)

1 teaspoon kosher salt

Directions

1. Preheat the oven to 350 F. Line a baking sheet with foil and coat with 1 tablespoon of the oil. Slice off and discard the root ends of the garlic heads, and place them, cut-side-down, on the prepared baking sheet. Drizzle each with 1 tablespoon oil. Wrap aluminum foil around the garlic. Roast for 30 to 40 minutes, until very soft. Let cool to the touch, and squeeze the pulp from the skins. Take the remaining oil and pulp and place in the bowl of a food processor and set aside. (If you would like to do this ahead of time, the pulp and oil will keep, covered, in the refrigerator, for 2 to 3 days.)

2. Meanwhile, set a heavy sauté pan or cast-iron pan over high heat. Add the almonds and cook, stirring, for 2 to 4 minutes, until they are pale brown in color. Reduce the heat as necessary so the almonds do not burn.

3. Add the toasted almonds, roasted red peppers, sherry, sherry vinegar, piment d’Espelette, smoked paprika and salt to the bowl of the food processor along with the roasted garlic pulp and process until smooth and thick.

Kitchen Tips

Want to roast or grill the peppers from scratch? Heat a grill or gas stove top. Holding the peppers with long-handled tongs, place them right on the grates of the hottest, highest flame and allow them to blacken all round, turning occasionally and working in batches as necessary. Place the warm peppers in a heat-resistant bowl and cover with plastic wrap. Cool to room temperature. When the peppers are cool to the touch, peel off the skin. Remove and discard the the stems and seeds. It’s fine if there is a little burnt skin left on the peppers; do not rinse them.

Piment d’Espelette is a mild chili pepper grown in the town of Espelette, in the south of France, in the Basque region. The whole peppers are sold dried; piment d’Espelette is also available in dried, powder form and as a paste.

Smoked paprika, or pimentón, originated in Spain. Where regular paprika is made from ground peppers, smoked paprika is made from grinding peppers that have been smoked first. Not surprisingly, this endows the spice with a smoky flavor. Its distinctive flavor is a hallmark of Spanish cooking, but it makes a delicious accent to many dishes. It is available in both sweet and hot varieties.

Smoky Tomato and Pomegranate BBQ Sauce

This sauce includes smoked paprika and pomegranate molasses. Credit: Copyright 2015 TheWeiserKitchen

This sauce includes smoked paprika and pomegranate molasses. Credit: Copyright 2015 TheWeiserKitchen

If you’re an all-around Mediterranean food lover, the Smoky Tomato and Pomegranate Sauce will be up your alley. This sauce is a mixed homage to Chef Yotam Ottolenghi’s ketchup, rich spiceways and vast talent — and my fixation with pomegranate molasses as a sweetener in barbecue sauces of every type. This sauce is complex, I will admit, and takes about half an hour. It is even better the second, third or even the fifth day — and wait until you add it to a ho-hum turkey or chicken meatloaf, serve it over a grilled halloumi cheese or slathered onto lamb skewers.

Prep time: 5 minutes

Cook time: 25 minutes

Total time: 30 minutes

Yield: About 1 cup

Ingredients

2 teaspoon cumin seeds

1 teaspoon fenugreek seeds

1 tablespoon smoked paprika (see Kitchen Tips)

1 tablespoon Urfa pepper (see Kitchen Tips)

1 teaspoon kirmizi pepper (see Kitchen Tips)

1/2 teaspoon ground cinnamon

1/4 cup extra virgin olive oil, dark green and spicy preferred

1/2 small onion, roughly chopped

1 1/2 teaspoons kosher salt

1/2 cup tomato paste, San Marzano preferred

6 cloves garlic, peeled and grated

1/4 cup pomegranate molasses

2 teaspoons brown sugar

Juice and zest of 3 limes

Directions

1. Toast and grind the spices: Heat heavy skillet or cast-iron skillet over high heat. Add the cumin and fenugreek seeds and toast for 30 seconds or until fragrant. Remove the pan from the heat. Transfer to a dedicated coffee or spice grinder and grind to a powder. Add in the smoked paprika, Urfa and kirmizi peppers and cinnamon and grind to combine. Set aside.

2. Reheat the skillet until hot. Add the olive oil and heat until it shimmers. Add the onions and salt and cook, stirring, for 3 to 4 minutes, or until translucent. Add the tomato paste, stir, and cook for 1 minute. Add the garlic and stir well. Reduce the heat to a simmer. Add the pomegranate molasses and brown sugar and stir until the sugar has dissolved. With a rubber spatula, scrape into the bowl of a food processor fitted with a metal blade.

3. Add the toasted and ground spices, lime juice and zest and process until smooth.

Kitchen Tips

Smoked paprika, or pimentón, originated in Spain. While regular paprika is made from ground peppers, smoked paprika is made from grinding peppers that have been smoked first. Not surprisingly, this endows the spice with a smoky flavor; it has also been described as woodsy. Its distinctive flavor is a hallmark of Spanish cooking, but it makes a delicious accent to many dishes. It is available in both sweet and hot varieties.

Urfa Biber is a Turkish red pepper from the region of Urfa. It is a dark purple or maroon color and is surprisingly soft; it looks and feels like ground raisins. The peppers are available from Kalustyan’s online and at many other large spice purveyors, as well as at high-end specialty markets and health food stores.

Kirmizi pepper is a mixture of sweet and hot peppers that have been crushed, salted, dried, ground to flakes and then coated with olive oil and roasted. The mixture originated in Turkey. The flavor is a combination of fiery heat, salt and sweetness.

The seasonings might sound exotic, but fear not. Well-stocked grocery stores, Whole Foods, Trader Joe’s, Fresh Market and spice shops will be your best bet, but they are all available online.

Cilantro and Mint Sauce

This cilantro dipping sauce can lean Indian or Latino. Credit: Copyright 2015 TheWeiserKitchen

This cilantro dipping sauce can lean Indian or Latino. Credit: Copyright 2015 TheWeiserKitchen

This dipping sauce can lean Indian or Latino; it can be tossed on hot pasta or used as a salad dressing; it can be added to miso soup or to guacamole. This is a wonderful and sprightly alternative for chimichuri sauce with grilled steak, lamb or chicken.

Prep time: 5 minutes

Cook time: 5 minutes

Total time: 10 minutes

Yield: About 1 cup

Ingredients

1 large bunch fresh cilantro, stems and leaves

1 large bunch flat-leaf parsley, stems and leaves<

1/2 small bunch fresh mint, stems and leaves

1 1/2-inch piece fresh ginger, peeled and grated

Juice and zest of 2 lemons

1/2 jalapeño pepper (or more if desired), seeds, stems and ribs removed (see Kitchen Tip)

1 teaspoon salt

1/2 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper

1/4 cup extra virgin olive oil

Directions

1. Combine the cilantro, parsley, mint, ginger, lemon juice and zest, jalapeño, salt and black pepper in the bowl of a food processor or blender and pulse until the mixture forms a smooth paste.

2. While the machine is running at medium speed, slowly drizzle in the oil through the feed tube and blend until smooth and creamy.

Kitchen Tips

This will keep in an airtight container in the refrigerator for about 3 days, but it will separate and should be re-blended before using.

The chemicals in chili peppers that cause that wonderful feeling of heat on the tongue can cause a not-so-wonderful feeling if they get into your eyes. Avoid touching your face or eyes after cutting one.

Super Mustardy BBQ Finishing Sauce

This sauce packs a lot of flavor. Credit: 2015 TheWeiserKitchen

This sauce packs a lot of flavor. Credit: 2015 TheWeiserKitchen

This barbecue sauce is simple to make and packs a lot of flavor. It is perfect with many flavor dense proteins — beef, lamb, dark meat turkey or chicken, and tempeh. It’s also tasty on thinly sliced eggplant or thickly sliced summer squashes. Use it a dipping sauce on the side.

Prep time: 10 minutes

Cook time: 10 minutes

Total time: 20 minutes

Yield: About 1 cup

Ingredients

1 tablespoon canola oil

1 small red onion, peeled and diced

2 garlic cloves, peeled and crushed

1/2 jalapeño pepper, seeded and chopped

1/4 cup cider vinegar

1/2 cup ketchup

3 tablespoons Dijon mustard, very strong preferred

1/4 cup packed brown sugar

Directions

1. Heat the canola oil in a medium saucepan over moderately high heat. Add the onion and garlic and sauté until softened, about 3 minutes. Add the pepper and vinegar and stir for 1 minute. Stir in the ketchup, mustard and brown sugar.

2. Reduce the heat to low and simmer for 10 minutes, or until sauce reaches the desired thickness.

3. Refrigerate, tightly covered in a bottle or jar.

Kitchen Tips

We prefer to cook the long-cooking proteins (chicken, turkey, and even eggplant) without any sauce at first, over a medium heat, with the fattiest or skin-covered side down first, to help keep the natural sugars from burning and allow time for thorough cooking. If it’s a quick-cooking item, such as beef or tempeh, you can brush the sauce on just before you start cooking. Slather on plenty of the sauce 1 to 2 minutes before you plan to remove the food from the grill.

Israeli-Style Amba Sauce

Amba sauce is made with mango and vinegar. Credit: Copyright 2015 TheWeiserKitchen

Amba sauce is made with mango and vinegar. Credit: Copyright 2015 TheWeiserKitchen

Amba is a condiment made from mango and vinegar and plenty of spices. It is a traditional topping for sabich sandwiches, a popular street food in Israel. There is a popular Indian version, which is chunky, oniony, tart from vinegar, and salty. The Israeli version is based on an Iraqi amba, which is a thin liquid made from green mangoes and plenty of lemons. Like all popular classics, amba has hundreds of variations, and many versions that cross between Indian and Iraqi style. My version is inspired by several of these (including Einat Admony’s recipe in her book, “Balaboosta,” and a wonderful version from Food52), but I did rather liberally adapt them all to create an amba with an unusually thick and creamy texture. This recipe blew us away my test kitchen chef (just sayin’). Just wait until you try it with grilled steak, lamb or chicken, or try it instead of mustard and/or mayo on any sandwich for a nice change.

Prep time: 35 minutes

Cook time: 25 minutes

Total time: 60 minutes

Yield: About 1 cup

Ingredients

2 tablespoons honey, mild floral preferred

Juice of 1 lemon

1/4 cup white wine vinegar

1 3/4 cups water

1 package (6 ounces) dried, unsulfured and unsweetened mango slices, preferably Trader Joe’s, roughly minced

1 fresh large unripe mango, peeled and cut into rough ½-inch dice

2 tablespoons mild olive oil

2 cloves garlic, peeled, cut in half, and finely minced, green centers removed

1/2 tablespoon toasted ground coriander

2 teaspoons fenugreek leaves (see Kitchen Tips for sources)

2 teaspoons toasted ground cumin

1 tablespoon ground turmeric

2 teaspoons fine sea salt

1/4 teaspoon Urfa pepper, optional

Directions

1. Pour the honey, lemon juice, vinegar and water into a small saucepan and set over medium heat. Add the chopped dried mango and the fresh mango, stir well, and bring to a gentle boil. Reduce the heat to a simmer and cook, stirring occasionally, for about 25 minutes, or until the all the mango pieces are soft.

2. While the mango is cooking, set a small, heavy saucepan over high heat. When it is very hot, add the oil and garlic, and stir for about 30 seconds, or until fragrant. Remove from the heat and add the coriander, fenugreek and cumin. Mix well. It will take on the consistency of a paste.

3. Add the garlic paste to the mango mixture and stir well. Add the turmeric, salt, Urfa pepper and stir well.

4. Remove the mango mixture from the heat, cover, and let stand for 15 minutes. With a rubber spatula, scrape the mixture into a food processor or high-speed blender and process until smooth. The sauce is ready to serve and will keep in a covered container in the refrigerator for up to 3 days.

Main photo: Heaven is a summer steak sandwich with a tasty sauce. Credit: Copyright 2015 TheWeiserKitchen



Zester Daily contributor Tami Weiser is a Connecticut-based food writer and editor, recipe developer, culinary educator and caterer. An alumnus of Vassar College and a former attorney, Weiser also studied at the Jewish Theological Seminar of America and taught Hebrew language, Jewish ethnography and Jewish culinary tradition for many years and is a high honors graduate of the Institute for Culinary Education in New York. She has also worked as a private chef and historical researcher. Her website, TheWeiserKitchen.com, is a culinary resource for creative kosher and non-kosher cooks alike.

NO COMMENTS

POST A COMMENT