Editor's Letter

A Zester Daily Thanksgiving: 2014 Favorites, Part 1 Image

Thanksgiving has become the most fluid of holidays. Sure, the staples have survived for a few centuries now – the turkey, the cranberries, the pumpkin pie. But as people travel, historians chime in, families grow, information spreads, cooks get creative and newcomers to the U.S. start their own traditions, the holiday evolves.

More and more there is no right way to spend Thanksgiving, except to eat. From pasta to pomegranates, turkey stuffing to turkey bread, it’s a time when the focus is on what’s on the table and not under the tree. And that is reason enough to give thanks.

Here is a sampling of some of Zester Daily Thanksgiving stories to get you through the holiday, wherever you might be spending it. The notes are directly from the contributors. Click on the links for each story.

Main courses

New Flavors at Thanksgiving? Start With the Bird by Mira Honeycutt: Thanksgiving has always been my favorite American holiday, though it’s not a tradition I was brought up with when I was growing up in Mumbai and Delhi.

Pasta Can Star on the Thanksgiving Table  by Nancy Harmon Jenkins: I will confess right from the start that I’ve never been a big fan of Thanksgiving. Call me Scrooge if you will, but I’ve never seen the point of eating oneself silly one day of the year.

Dungeness Crabs Are a Bay Area Tradition by Tina Caputo: As Americans there are certain holiday food traditions many of us share: turkey at Thanksgiving, gingerbread at Christmas. But in addition to these commonalities, regional specialties, from tamales in Texas to kalua turkeys in Hawaii.

Side dishes

In or Out of the Bird, This Stuffing Swings Both Ways by Kathy Hunt: Most of my friends possess heartwarming tales about Thanksgiving, of a day spent roasting aromatic turkeys, peeling and mashing potatoes and hanging out with their families in warm, inviting kitchens.

This Year, Try a Corn Dish From the First Thanksgiving by Clifford A. Wright: Although there is no menu of the first harvest celebration that is usually called the first Thanksgiving, there are some sound ideas of what foods, if not precise preparations, were on the table.

Kabocha: Thanksgiving’s Sophisticated Squash by Sonoko Sakai: Nothing is more quintessentially fall than squash. Their varietal colors and shapes are much to be admired, and their brightly colored interiors make magnificent food.

Giving Rise to a New Tradition: Turkey Bread by Emily Grosvenor: The orders for bread shaped like a turkey roll in year-round at Golden Crown Panaderia in Albuquerque, N.M., but they start coming in fast and earnest at the beginning of November.

Truffle Mac and Cheese Makes Comfort Food Special by David Latt: When chef David Codney showed me how easy it is to make his signature truffle macaroni and cheese, I knew I was going to make this elegant dish for Thanksgiving.

Roasted Tomato and Corn Salad, All-American for the Holiday by Susan Lutz: I’m starting to prepare for winter but I haven’t given up on fall’s bounty. This year I plan to serve roasted tomato and corn salad as a side dish for our Thanksgiving meal.

Thanksgiving Takes Shape, With Salmon by Francine Segan: Lots of our traditional Thanksgiving dishes come from the English. Food we think of as American, like apple pie and turkey with stuffing, originated in Elizabethan England.

Desserts

Yes, It’s Gluten Free: Have This Pie and Eat the Crust Too by Martha Rose Shulman: For years my sister, who cannot tolerate gluten, has foregone stuffing at Thanksgiving, and carefully scraped her pumpkin pie filling away from the crust.

Serve Forth the Apple to Give Thanks by Julia della Croce: Despite the myths that get bandied around about what was served at the first Thanksgiving, the only report we have, from Pilgrim chronicler Edward Winslow, says simply that the Wampanoag contributed five deer.

New here and there

Fry Bread and Corn Soup for Thanksgiving by Sylvia Wong Lewis: In the United States, Thanksgiving is a tradition dating back to the Pilgrims and Native Americans — but it may surprise some to know that Native Americans continue to celebrate the holiday, just in their own manner.

Chestnut Soup: A Taste of Home for Americans Abroad by Ruth Tobias: Jennifer Jasinski is about to tackle a whole new challenge: cooking Thanksgiving dinner for American expats in Paris.

Southern-Style Holidays: Butter It, Fry It, Pickle It by Cynthia Bertelsen: “Swimpee! Swimpee!” shouted the shrimp vendors of years past in Charleston, S.C., as they wended their way through the streets, the fresh shrimp in their baskets glistening in the early morning light.

Celebrating Thanksgiving Far From Home by Barbara Haber: You may find yourself far from home on Thanksgiving, even out of the country, as your work calls you away or alluring travel opportunities arise.

Persian Fall Festival: Pomegranates and Memories by Sylvia Wong Lewis: Mehregan, a Persian version of Thanksgiving is an ancient Iranian holiday that celebrates the fall season and harvest. In New York City, Cafe Nadery in Greenwich Village kicked off its first Mehregan celebration recently.

Main photo: Zester Daily 2014 favorites including recipes of Turkey Bread, Roasted Tomato and Corn Salad, Two-Way Stuffing and a Persian-style pomegranate dish. Photo composite: Karen Chaderjian

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Napa Valley On The Razor’s Edge Image

 It is quiet at Cain Vineyards. The hillside estate at the top of Napa Valley’s Spring Mountain is far removed from the hustle of the valley floor. The air is crisp, days are short, winter has arrived and there has been rain. Just enough, says Cain winemaker Chris Howell, to ignite new life in the desiccated vineyards.

Napa Valley winemakers, or at least enough of them to signify the start of a trend, are rethinking the region’s excessive tendencies. Lost for decades in a soulless race to please a handful of critics with dubious taste, these evolving winemakers are trying to reconnect with the soil and climate of America’s most celebrated wine region. While their wines still reflect the strength of the valley’s sunny climate, they are striving for lower alcohol levels and more restrained fruit flavors.

Howell doesn’t have to change. He has been making terroir-driven wines for decades. And paid a price for that unfashionable decision. Overlooked by critics, his wines have been relative bargains, and most bottles are priced $75 or below. Still, you could say that the newly chastened winemakers are playing catch up with him. And none too soon.

California’s drought has Napa Valley on a razor’s edge. Howell says rain is now a “miracle,” a spiritual event. On Spring Mountain where the only water for the vineyards falls from the sky, those two inches will carry the vineyard through to spring.

“It reminds me that wine is about gardening, nature and the earth,” says Howell. “Those of us on Napa’s hillsides and completely disconnected from the water grid think about these things now.”

There was almost no rain in 2013. By the spring of 2014, there had been 14 months with nothing beyond a few sprinkles. “It was a shock, a big wake-up. I didn’t think we would have any grapes. None.” Rain, not much, but enough, came at the perfect time in February and March of 2014 to save the vintage.

The recent rain falls far short of guaranteeing next year’s vintage. “But the vines loved it. The soil came to life.”

Cain’s 90 acres of vineyards are scattered across the estate’s 550 acres of some of the most rugged hillsides in Napa. The winery’s Cabernet Sauvignon-based wines have a complex herbal quality that sets them apart from other Napa Cabs. His intense, dark wines have a lightness that allows them a seat at the dinner table. They have always been softer, less tannic and more nuanced, even lilting, than the heavier fruit-forward wines most often associated with Napa.

Cain Vineyard's 90 acres are scattered across some of the most rugged hillsides in the Napa Valley. Credit:  Janis Miglavs

Cain Vineyard’s 90 acres are scattered across some of the most rugged hillsides in the Napa Valley. Credit: Janis Miglavs

His old-school wines are the result of Howell’s belief that the best wines reflect what is happening in the vineyard. Over the decades Howell has managed Cain’s vineyards, he’s dialed back the irrigation, dry farming the plots where the soils are deep enough. He has farmed organically for 15 years and now is bringing biodynamic — an extreme organic, somewhat metaphysical farming discipline advanced by Rudolf Steiner early in the 20th century — to Cain’s vineyards.

“The more people pay attention to the whole ecosystem of the vineyard, the healthier the vineyard. And, in general, biodynamic vineyards are healthier everywhere I’ve visited them around the world,” says Howell.

That’s given Cain a bit of protection against the ravages of the drought. “We live year to year now,” he says. “I always took the winter rains for granted. They always came. I didn’t think about it. Now I know we can take nothing for granted. I feel closer to the reality of nature, to the vineyards.”

Howell delights in making wines that vary year to year. The drought will be but another marker. So soon in the winemaking process for the 2014 vintage, it’s too early to know how it will change the wines.

How the drought affects his wines doesn’t concern Howell. Using only the wild yeast from the vineyard to ferment his grapes, Howell has given control of his wines back to nature. These days, that is an act of supreme faith. “We think about the spiritual part of things more often these days,” he says.

Other Napa winemakers may never catch up with such radical thinking.

Main photo: Cain Vineyards in the Napa Valley. Credit: Janis Miglavs

* * *

 Cain Vineyards makes just three wines:

Cain Five ($125)

Cain Five comes is 100% from the Cain Vineyard, and is a blend of Cabernet Sauvignon, Merlot, Malbec, Cab Franc and Petit Verdot.

Cain Concept ($75)

Cain Concept comes from alluvial soils in the Benchland areas of the Napa Valley. It is a blend of Cab Sauv, Merlot, Cab Franc, Petit Verdot.

Cain Cuvee ($34)
NV10, is a blend of two vintages (51% 2010 and 49% 2009) and is a blend of Merlot, Cab, Cab Franc and Petite Verdot. Sourced from Rutherford, Yountville, Spring Mountain and Atlas Pea.

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