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Julia della Croce is a journalist and James Beard Award-winning cookbook author and cooking teacher. Many of her titles have been translated into 13 other languages and distributed worldwide. Her work has appeared in many publications including Cook’s, Food & Wine, Art & Antiques and the Boston Globe. She has broadcast extensively on radio and television, including NPR and the Food Network. Her blog, Forktales, has been cited by The New York Times' Diner's Journal "What We’re Reading" section.

Besides working toward the preservation of traditional Italian cuisine through publishing and teaching, Julia has dedicated herself to advocacy work for better food and sustainable agriculture. She pioneered an award-winning healthy school food program at an independent school in New York and developed a nutrition program providing natural food and local farm-raised produce to an emergency food pantry in New York City serving some 900,000 people every year. She serves on the advisory committee of the New York State Assembly Task Force on Food, Farm and Nutrition Policy. Read more about Julia on www.juliadellacroce.com.

Brassica rapa at the Palo del Colle market in Puglia, Italy. Credit: Copyright 2014 Nathan Hoyt/Forktales

Summer has yet to deliver its full range of vegetables, but one stalwart crop that keeps on giving is Brassica rapa (from rapum, Latin

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Viola Buitoni's Sauteed Broccoli Rapini with Potatoes. Credit: Hirsheimer & Hamilton, from "Italian Home Cooking: 125 Recipes to Comfort Your Soul"

Cime di rapa (turnip tops), broccoli di rapa, broccoletti di rapa, and rape (räp' - eh), are Italian names for what Americans dub broccoli

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Harvesting the ancient tomatoes of Naples, San Marzano, Campania. Credit: Paolo Ruggiero, DaniCoop

A question I'm often asked is how to make the best so-called "marinara." It's one that vexes me as much as the perennial hunt

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Radicchio stuffed with goat cheese. Credit: Copyright 2016 Nathan Hoyt/Forktales

If radicchio has become wildly popular in the States, it still doesn't get the respect it deserves: Americans have adopted the showy vegetable as

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Beef and Guinness stew. Credit: Copyright 2015 Nathan Hoyt/Forktales

Not so long ago, most Americans' idea of how to enjoy beef was to dig into a slab of steak as big as the

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Fresh tagliatelle with pomodori scoppiati at Le Comari di Farfa, Castelnuovo di Farfa, Rieti. Credit: Copyright 2016 Nathan Hoyt/Forktales

At long last, cherry tomatoes are here, pay dirt for every ghastly love apple we've had to eat out of season. Whether Italian heirlooms

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In Italy, there's a move to protect olive oil. Credit: Copyright 2016 Julia della Croce

Between revelations by Italian police in December linking organized crime to 7,000 tons of counterfeit olive oil, and an estimated four-fold increase in adulterated

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French-style roast chicken. Credit: Copyright 2015 Nathan Hoyt/Forktales

"You can always judge the quality of a cook or a restaurant by roast chicken," wrote Julia Child in "Mastering the Art of French

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